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A Comparison of Self-Reported Weekly Time Demands for Cadet and Faculty Populations the United States Military Academy

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Conference

2021 Fall ASEE Middle Atlantic Section Meeting

Location

Virtually Hosted by the section

Publication Date

November 12, 2021

Start Date

November 12, 2021

End Date

November 13, 2021

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

28

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/38416

Download Count

84

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Paper Authors

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Joshua S Wiley United States Military Academy

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Captain Joshua Wiley, U.S. Army, is an Instructor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the United States Military Academy. He is a 2010 graduate of the United States Military Academy with a B.S. in Civil Engineering and GIS (Geographic Information Systems), a 2015 graduate of the University of Missouri Science and Technology with an M.S. in Petroleum Engineering and a 2019 graduate from Stanford University with an M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering. He teaches Environmental Science, Environmental Engineering Technologies, and Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes.

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MICHAEL Robert GREIFENSTEIN United States Military Academy, Department of Geography & Environmental Engineering

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Lieutenant Colonel Michael Greifenstein, U.S. Army, is an Instructor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the United States Military Academy. He is a 2002 graduate of the United States Military Academy with a B. S. in Environmental Science, a 2012 graduate of the Uniformed Service University of the Health Sciences with an M.S. in Public Health and a graduate of the Command and General Staff College with Honors. He teaches Physical Geography and serves as the USMA Public Health Advisor.

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Andrew Ross Pfluger P.E. United States Military Academy Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6960-2075

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Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Pfluger, U.S. Army, is an Associate Professor and Academy Professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the United States Military Academy. He currently serves as the Director of the Environmental Program, which includes Environmental Engineering and Environmental Science. He earned a B.S. in Civil Engineering from USMA, a M.S. and Engineer Degree in Environmental Engineering and Science from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. He is a licensed PE in the state of Delaware.

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Abstract

In the immediate and continued aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, colleges and universities have adapted and shifted to alternate, sometimes novel, modalities of learning, all the while preserving the academic rigors and standards necessary to develop competent, critical thinkers across every discipline. Adaptation to new modes of learning, followed by the "bouncing forward" of institutions resuming use of teaching frameworks ubiquitous to the pre-pandemic classroom, requires one resource common to both individual and institutional inputs: the use and management of time. The authors have previously observed that the different teaching methods and technologies propagated in the 2020-2021 timeframe have shifted the in- and out-of-classroom time necessary for learners to achieve markers of academic proficiency and wonder if a comparison of where time commitments peak between faculty and cadet (student) samples over a mid-semester span of time may indicate a point where time becomes a limiting factor in student preparedness capacity or faculty available time.

One institution that historically places high demands on the time of its learners is the United States Military Academy (USMA). Cadets spend four years at USMA preparing to become commissioned military officers who must be able to prioritize and process a diverse stream of requirements and tasks spanning the three pillars of USMA – academics, physical fitness, and military training. Those cadets currently in their sophomore, junior, and senior year have already navigated three challenging semesters, and due to the recent global pandemic, varying degrees of shifting time ratios of in-person, remote, hybrid (combination of both in-person and remote) and asynchronous learning modalities.

This study examines the self-reported time commitments for a sample of both USMA faculty and cadets at over several mid-semester weeks during the fall semester, following further evolution to USMA’s institutional learning practices. We approached this topic with the hypothesis that the relative ranking of highest to lowest weekly time commitment over a several week span is unrelated in faculty and cadet respondents as a result of manipulating the group type of respondents. Our survey is designed to tabulate several types of academic-related time commitments to include real-time class attendance, lesson preparation, time spent on graded work and other categories with a parallel faculty and cadet activity set.

The results of this study may impact, narrowly, the time management and self-awareness of respondents who did not previously account for their evolving needs in time management amidst a campaign of “bouncing forward” and in a broader sense, can open additional avenues for considering the evenness of time demands by-week for courses at USMA, alongside the academic and non-academic demands placed upon both educators and learners at this institution.

Wiley, J. S., & GREIFENSTEIN, M. R., & Pfluger, A. R. (2021, November), A Comparison of Self-Reported Weekly Time Demands for Cadet and Faculty Populations the United States Military Academy Paper presented at 2021 Fall ASEE Middle Atlantic Section Meeting, Virtually Hosted by the section. https://strategy.asee.org/38416

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