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A Manufacturing Curriculum Using a Student-driven Pedagogy of Integrated, Reinforced, Active Learning (SPIRAL) Approach

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Collection

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Progress in Manufacturing Education III

Tagged Division

Manufacturing

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

25.62.1 - 25.62.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20822

Download Count

42

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Paper Authors

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Andrew Peter Vogt University of Utah

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Andrew Peter Vogt is a Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering at the University of Utah. He received his B.S. from the University of Idaho in mechanical engineering. In addition to his Ph.D. research in human related slip studies, he has taught statics and mechanics of materials for the Department of Mechanical Engineering, is working on a University Teaching Assistantship for developing the SPIRAL Manufacturing Curriculum, and teaches skiing at Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort. Vogt is aspiring to be an educator and is highly interested in innovative, hands-on teaching techniques.

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Stacy Bamberg University of Utah

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Stacy J. Morris Bamberg is an Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Utah. She received her B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her D.Sc. in medical engineering from the joint Harvard/MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. She teaches the required freshman design sequence, the required junior mechatronics sequence, and electives in musculoskeletal functional anatomy for engineers and medical instrumentation and physiology. She is interested in the use of technology in the classroom and improving student outcomes through hands-on and interactive experiences.

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Debra J. Mascaro University of Utah

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Debra J. Mascaro is the Director of Undergraduate Studies in mechanical engineering at the University of Utah. She holds a B.A. in physics from Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minn., and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She teaches freshman design and senior- and graduate-level classes in microscale engineering and organic electronics.

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Abstract

A Manufacturing Curriculum using a Student-driven Pedagogyof Integrated, Reinforced, Active Learning (SPIRAL) ApproachAbstractEngineering is continuously evolving with increasing complex systems. The complexity of thesesystems requires a wider breadth of material to be covered which makes it more difficult to pro-vide high quality education. Also, while student numbers are vastly increasing, faculty, staff,and resources are dwindling. The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University ofUtah had been focusing on a new curriculum which covers multiple engineering disciplines, de-sign techniques, methodologies, and knowledge of skills in professional practice. Formally, thisis known as the Student-driven Pedagogy of Integrated, Reinforced, Active Learning (SPIRAL)approach. Manufacturing has been an incredibly important part of mechanical engineering sinceits conception. This paper describes teaching manufacturing using the SPIRAL approach. Usingthis approach will give students more manufacturing experience, which will lead to quicker andbetter conceptualized designs. Because manufacturing will be taught throughout a student’s career,rather than in one solid segment, this will also help ensure that students are constantly remindedof manufacturing safety concerns. To help counter the problem of dwindling resources, the manu-facturing SPIRAL approach will use carefully designed supplemental materials including a seriesof teaching videos and certification exams. The students must pass both a written and in-personpractical exam to use university manufacturing equipment. The approach will also allow facultyand staff to better monitor students to ensure safe and efficient working environments.

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