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A Remote Laboratory For Stress And Deformation Study

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Web-based learning

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

11.109.1 - 11.109.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1220

Download Count

31

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Paper Authors

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Alamgir Choudhury Western Michigan University

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Alamgir A. Choudhury is an assistant professor of industrial and manufacturing engineering at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan. He earned his MS and PhD from NMSU(Las Cruces) and BS in mechanical engineering from BUET (Dhaka). His interest includes computer applications in curriculum, MCAE, mechanics, fluid power and instrumentation & process control. He is also a Registered Professional Engineer in the State of Ohio and affiliated with ASME, ASEE, SME and TAP.

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Jorge Rodriguez Western Michigan University

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Jorge Rodriguez is an Associate Professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering and a Research Associate of the Human Performance Institute at Western Michigan University. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Wisconsin-Madison and his M.B.A. from Rutgers University in Piscataway, NJ. Dr. Rodriguez teaches courses in Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing, Mechanical Design, Biomechanics and Finite Element Analysis. His research is in the field of computers in engineering, particularly in machine design, systems modeling, and biomechanics.

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Sam Ramrattan Western Michigan University

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Sam Ramrattan is a professor of IME department at Western Michigan University. He has BS in manufacturing engineering, MS in management technology and PhD in industrial technology. His areas of research and publications are metal casting, plastic process, materials and manufacturing process improvement. He is a professionally active member of ETP, TAP, SME, SPE, AFS and Key Professor of Foundry Education Foundation.

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Mitchel Keil Western Michigan University

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Dr. Keil is an associate professor in the Industrial and Manufacturing Department at Western Michigan University. He received his Ph.D. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute (VPI&SU), his MS from Florida Atlantic University, and his BSME from VPI&SU. His areas of expertise are mechanisms, computer graphics, CAD/CAM/CAE, and vibrations. He is a registered professional engineer in the State of Florida. He has had industrial work experience at Litton Poly-Scientific, Motorola, and Bethlehem Steel Corp.

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Pavel Ikonomov Western Michigan University

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Dr. Ikonomov is an assistant professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Western Michigan University. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Hokkaido University, Japan; his M. Eng. from Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Japan and M. Sc. from Technical University of Varna, Bulgaria. His research is in the field of Virtual Reality simulation, Nanotechnology, CAM, Tolerance modeling and inspection.

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Abhishek Goyal Western Michigan University

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Abhishek Goyal graduated with a Masters in Manufacturing Engineering from the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Western Michigan University in December 2005. He has a BS in mechanical engineering from Bangalore Institute of Technology. As a graduate student he worked in several sponsored research projects in design optimization and online control system. He is proficient in AutoCAD, Unigraphics, SolidWorks, Pro-E, Promodel and Maxwell 2D system and has programmed in C, C++ and html environment.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A remote laboratory for stress and deformation study

Abstract

Analysis of stress and deformation in beam elements are utilized in a wide range of curricula in both engineering and engineering technology programs. In a typical undergraduate class, learning of a theoretical method is often reinforced by computer aided analysis and practical experiments in a formal laboratory setting. Using the current technology, in a lecture only mechanics class, certain theoretical learning can be complemented by online experimental verifications without leaving the lecture class. The paper addresses development of a laboratory setup that can apply load to a beam element and allows monitoring the resulting stress and deformation through the web. The laboratory consists of a pneumatic beam loading mechanism, stress and position sensors, data acquisition system, and application programs for data monitoring, analysis and control. Using this system, one can quickly create an experimental setup for a theoretical problem, apply the load, and record the resulting stress and deformation remotely through the web. Close agreement between the analytical and experimental results would establish the validity of the theoretical solution without the use of a formal laboratory class. It would also create awareness among the students of the class on limitations of the theoretical methods to predict the behavior of structural members in reality. The use of modern sensors, data acquisition instrumentation and application programs to monitor and control such an application can also be beneficial as laboratory practices for undergraduate level hydraulics/pneumatics or instrumentation classes.

Introduction

Stress and deformation analysis1,2 is an integral part of undergraduate level mechanical design curricula in both engineering and engineering technology programs. The goal is to teach stress and deformation analysis for design of mechanical components and system. It includes setup of a problem for stress and deformation analysis based on applied external loads, select the most effective method to solve the problem and apply the result to design a safe and functional component. The effectiveness of this learning depends on the depth of subject matter covered and the method of instruction. In the engineering technology programs, the emphasis is on mastering the techniques and tools for the solution of a problem. After learning the theoretical foundations, students use both analytical and computer assisted solution methods for this purpose. They are also introduced to

Choudhury, A., & Rodriguez, J., & Ramrattan, S., & Keil, M., & Ikonomov, P., & Goyal, A. (2006, June), A Remote Laboratory For Stress And Deformation Study Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/1220

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