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An Automated Bottle Filling And Capping Project For Freshman Engineering Students

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Collection

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Early Engineering Design Experiences

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Page Count

22

Page Numbers

15.144.1 - 15.144.22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15723

Download Count

4935

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Paper Authors

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Kala Meah York College of Pennsylvania

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Kala Meah received his B.Sc. from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology in
1998, M.Sc. from South Dakota State University in 2003, and Ph.D. from the University of
Wyoming in 2007, all in Electrical Engineering. Between 1998 and 2000 he worked for several
power industries in Bangladesh. Dr. Meah is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Physical Science at York College of Pennsylvania. His research interest includes electrical power, HVDC transmission, renewable energy, power engineering education, and energy conversion.

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Timothy Garrison York College of Pennsylvania

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Tim Garrison is the coordinator of the mechanical engineering program at York College. He received his BS and PhD degrees from Penn State University and his MS degree from Stanford. He has worked in industry for both AT&T Bell Laboratories and AT&T Federal Systems. He has taught a broad range of classes across the mechanical engineering curriculum. His research interests are in the areas of experimental fluid mechanics, thermal sciences and engineering education.

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James Kearns York College of Pennsylvania

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James Kearns received his BSME (SEAS) and BS Economics (Wharton), University of Pennsylvania; M.Eng., Carnegie-Mellon University; PhD, Georgia Tech. Dr. Kearns was a Post-Doctoral Fellow with ARL, University of Texas at Austin. Currently, Dr. Kearns is an Associate Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Physical Science, at York College of Pennsylvania. His research interests include noise and vibration control, acoustic diffraction phenomena, outdoor sound Propagation, design of smart quiet structures, electrical energy, and engineering education.

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Gregory Link York College of Pennsylvania

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Greg Link is an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the York College of Pennsylvania. He received his B.S. in Physics from Juniata College and his BS in Electrical Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University, where he went on to complete his PhD in 2006 under Dr. N. Vijaykrishnan. His areas of interest include embedded systems design, microprocessor systems development, network-on-chip design, and temperature-aware computing.

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Laura Garrison York College of Pennsylvania

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Dr. Laura Garrison received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas and her M.S. in Operations Research from Stanford University. She then worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories and AT&T Federal Systems before deciding to pursue her Ph.D. in Bioengineering at Penn State University in the area of experimental fluid mechanics associated with the artificial heart. After graduating, she worked at Voith Hydro for five years in the area of Computational Fluid Mechanics. For the last eight years, she has been a professor at York College of Pennsylvania where she teaches thermal sciences, freshmen design courses, and computer programming.

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Wayne Blanding York College of Pennsylvania

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Wayne Blanding received his B.S. degree in Systems Engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1982, Ocean Engineer degree from the MIT/Woods Hole Joint Program in Ocean Engineering in 1990, and PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Connecticut in 2007. From 1982 to 2002 was an officer in the U.S. Navy’s submarine force. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at York College of Pennsylvania. His research interests include target tracking, detection, estimation, and engineering education.

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Emine Celik York College of Pennsylvania

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Emine Celik is currently an Assistant Professor at York College of Pennsylvania. In 2008, she worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Mechanical Engineering Department at Johns Hopkins University. She received her Master of Science and Ph.D degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Lehigh University. Emine Celik’s research interests include design and development of engineering systems using analytical and experimental approaches (advanced global imaging techniques). Areas of applications include flow-induced vibrations, flow around bluff bodies, airfoils, perforated plates, cavity configurations, and biomedical devices.

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Jennifer Dawson York College of Pennsylvania

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Dr. Jennifer Bower Dawson is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at York College of Pennsylvania where she teaches courses in Machine Design, Controls, and Capstone Design. She earned her MS and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University where she worked on the design and testing of spacecraft hardware for Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle. Her academic interests include robotics, sensor design, precision engineering, and service learning in engineering education.

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Stephen Kuchnicki York College of Pennsylvania

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Dr. Stephen Kuchnicki is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at York College of Pennsylvania. Previously, he was a postdoctoral research associate at Rutgers University, specializing in computational modeling of dynamic deformations in solids. His areas of technical expertise include solid mechanics, crystal plasticity, vibration, and fluid-structure interaction. He received his PhD from Rutgers University in 2001.

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Barry McFarland York College of Pennsylvania

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Barry McFarland received his BS in Technology Education from Millersville University in 1971 and MS in Technology Education from the Pennsylvania State University in 1981. Currently, Mr. McFarland is the Machine Shop Manager in the Department of Physical Science at York College of Pennsylvania.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

An Automated Bottle Filling and Capping Project for Freshman Engineering Students

Abstract: All freshman engineering students at York College participate in a spring semester design challenge as part of a year-long, two-course introduction to engineering. This paper describes the course organization, the project goals, and project itself and how it supports the broader engineering curriculum goals of engaging freshman engineering students in a design project, exposing them in an interesting way to the breath of engineering, and motivating them in their engineering studies.

The students work in small teams and have roughly 12 weeks to design an automated electro- mechanical system that first transports three empty Snapple bottles, three tennis balls, and 36 oz. of water to a 2⁄x3⁄ operational zone. The machine must fill each bottle with 12 oz. of water, cap each bottle by covering the top with a tennis ball, and then deliver the capped and filled bottles to an area outside of the operational zone.

The bottle-filling project serves as the second of two interdisciplinary engineering design experiences during the freshman year. It introduces aspects of computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering, including the following five primary knowledge areas: (i) machining and fabrication; (ii) electronic circuit prototyping and programming; (iii) sensor and actuator applications; (iv) mechanical design; (v) project planning; and (vi) presentation skills.

A project demonstration at the end of the semester determines the relative effectiveness of each machine based upon a number of quantitative factors, including the total time required to complete the overall process, the volume of water in each bottle, the number of bottles successfully capped, the amount of water spilled, and approximate manufacturing cost. Some qualitative factors considered are simplicity, creativity, and aesthetics. Student interest in this substantial hands-on experience, as measured by surveys and exhibited by attendance, enthusiasm, productivity, and success, appears to be high through the three years it has been assigned.

1. Introduction

Traditionally, engineering curricula at the college or university level provide solid backgrounds of theory and analysis before progressing to any significant practical and creative activities. The engineering faculty at York College believes that for many students this is not the best approach. First-year engineering students are often enthusiastic about engineering, science, and technology, but many students find that their zeal is diminished due to the gap between engineering practice

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