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An Integrated Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Laboratory Course

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

BME Laboratory Courses and Experiences

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

32

Page Numbers

14.200.1 - 14.200.32

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4914

Download Count

337

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Paper Authors

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Conrad Zapanta Carnegie Mellon University

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Warren Ruder Carnegie Mellon University

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Warren Ruder is a graduate student researcher at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. Warren is completing a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon where he previously earned an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering. He received his S.B. in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously, Warren served as a Health Science Specialist in the VA Boston Healthcare System, affiliated with Harvard Medical School, studying cell physiology and signaling processes. Warren’s research interests include cell mechanics, stem cell therapy, bio-MEMS/NEMS design, microfluidics, and mechanotransduction.

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Justin Newberg Carnegie Mellon University

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Justin Y. Newberg is a doctoral candidate in Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. He received his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. At Carnegie Mellon, Justin was a recipient of the Biomedical Engineering Department's teaching assistant award in 2007. Justin's research interests include using machine learning to automatically analyze subcellular protein patterns in various different conditions.

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Paul Glass Carnegie Mellon University

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Paul Glass received the B.Eng. degree in mechanical engineering (with a minor in arts) from McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, in 2005. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree in biomedical engineering at the NanoRobotics Laboratory,
Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. His current research interests include medical robots, biologically inspired adhesives, and minimally invasive surgical technologies. Mr. Glass was awarded a Dowd-ICES Fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University in 2006.

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Davneet Minhas

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Davneet Minhas is a Ph.D. candidate in Biomedical Engineering. He is developing a flexible needle steering system for percutaneous navigation within
deep zones of the brain. He received a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University.

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Elvira Garcia Osuna Carnegie Mellon University

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Elvira Garcia Osuna is a Special Lecturer for the Ray and Stephanie Lane Center for Computational Biology and the Joint CMU-Pitt Ph.D. Program in Computational Biology. Dr. Garcia Osuna received her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. She received her B.E. degree in Engineering Science with a specialization in Biomedical Engineering from Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY. Dr. Garcia Osuna's research interests include Bioimage Processing, Machine Learning, Microscopy and Flow Cytometry.

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Liang Tso Sun Carnegie Mellon University

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Liang Tso (Steve) Sun is a PhD candidate in Department of Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. Sun received his B.S. in Biochemistry from University of Washington in Seattle, WA. Sun's research interests include bioactive materials and stem cell delivery for wound healing applications.

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Alyssa Siefert Carnegie Mellon University

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Alyssa Siefert is a senior at Carnegie Mellon University who will graduate in May with a dual degree in Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and a minor in Professional Writing. She will go on to pursue a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Yale University in the Fall of 2009.

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Judy Shum Carnegie Mellon University

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Judy Shum is a doctoral candidate in Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. She received his B.S. in
Electrical Engineering at Bucknell University and her M.E. at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Judy's research interest include developing a diagnostic tool to assess the rupture potential of abdominal aortic aneurysms through the use of image processing techniques.

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Portia Taylor Carnegie Mellon University

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Portia E. Taylor is a PhD student in the Biomedical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University. Portia received her B.S. in Computer Science from Grambling State University in 2007. Portia is a recipient of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship as well as the GEM Consortium Graduate Fellowship. She serves as student leader and Recruitment Coordinator for the NSF funded Quality of Life Technology Center. Portia's research interests include rehabilitation assistive devices, activity classification, and neural prothesis.

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Arielle Drummond Carnegie Mellon University

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Arielle Drummond is currently a Senior Scientist at Medtronic Cardiovascular in Danvers, MA in research and development of transcatheter therapies. Dr. Drummond received her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA and her B.S and M.S from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Drummond’s research interest include circulatory support devices, anatomic modeling and cardiovascular fluid dynamics.

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Bur Chu Carnegie Mellon University

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Bur Chu is a doctoral candidate in Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. She received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering with an additional degree in Biomedical Engineering. Her research interests include biomimetic tissue engineered materials and muscoloskeletal tissue repair and regeneration.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

An Integrated Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Laboratory Course

Abstract

Laboratory courses are an essential part of a successful undergraduate engineering curriculum. An integrated laboratory course was developed to provide undergraduates in biomedical engineering with the opportunity to make measurements on and interpret data from living systems. Through a combination of lectures and laboratory experiences, the students were exposed to five areas of biomedical engineering: cellular and molecular biotechnology, bioinstrumentation, bioimaging, biomaterials, and biomechanics. These areas were selected because they correspond to the biomedical engineering tracks at Carnegie Mellon University.

The cellular and molecular biotechnology module consists of two labs. The first is an introductory lab that consists of a pipetting exercise and practice of sterile technique in handling cells. The second lab involves transforming E. coli with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmid, a common procedure in biological laboratories. The bioinstrumentation module incorporates data acquisition basics and the measurement and analysis of EKG (electrocardiography) signals. In the bioimaging module, the students collect biological images using an automated microscope. These images are then analyzed using both standard and customized MATLAB functions. The biomaterials module involves the fabrication of photopolymerizable monomers and adhesion peptides to make hydrogels of varying peptide concentrations. Changes in cell adhesion and spreading of NIH-3T3 (mouse fibroblast) cells on these hydrogels are then observed. In the biomechanics module, students measure and analyze EMG (electromyography) signals and relate force generation and limb movement to these signals.

This course also includes a research project. Students research how a technique presented in this course is used to develop a medical device, clinical therapy, or to study a biological process. Students present their projects as both a poster in a public setting, and in a written report.

This class has been taught to over 150 students to date over the last two years. This integrated approach has consistently received favorable course evaluations from students and faculty and meets several ABET criteria.

1. Introduction

The Department of Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University uses a track system to provide in-depth exposure to an area of biomedical engineering that complements the second major (Chemical Engineering, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering). Four tracks are offered:

Zapanta, C., & Ruder, W., & Newberg, J., & Glass, P., & Minhas, D., & Osuna, E. G., & Sun, L. T., & Siefert, A., & Shum, J., & Taylor, P., & Drummond, A., & Chu, B. (2009, June), An Integrated Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Laboratory Course Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/4914

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