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Board 102: Development of the Persistence of Engineers in the Academy Survey (PEAS)

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Minorities in Engineering Division Technical Session 3

Tagged Division

Minorities in Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32169

Download Count

18

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Paper Authors

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Julie Aldridge Ohio State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6655-5971

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Julie Aldridge is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. She received her Ph.D in Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership and M.S. in Natural Resources both from The Ohio State University.

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So Yoon Yoon Texas A&M University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-1868-1054

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So Yoon Yoon, Ph.D., is an associate research scientist at Institute for Engineering Education and Innovation (IEEI) in College of Engineering at Texas A&M University and Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station (TEES). She received a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with specialties in Gifted Education and a M.S.Ed. in Educational Psychology with specialties in Research Methods and Measurement both from Purdue University. She also holds a M.S. in Astronomy and Astrophysics and a B.S. in Astronomy and Meteorology both from Kyungpook National University in South Korea. Her work centers on engineering education research, as a psychometrician, program evaluator, and institutional data analyst. She has research interests on spatial ability, creativity, gifted education, STEM education, and meta-analyses. She has authored/co-authored more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference proceedings and served as a journal reviewer in engineering education, STEM education, and educational psychology, as well as a co-PI, an external evaluator or advisory board member on several NSF-funded projects (CAREER, iCorps, REU, RIEF, etc.).

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Monica Farmer Cox Ohio State University

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Monica F. Cox, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. Prior to this appointment, she was a Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University, the Inaugural Director of the College of Engineering's Leadership Minor, and the Director of the International Institute of Engineering Education Assessment (i2e2a). In 2013, she became founder and owner of STEMinent LLC, a company focused on STEM education assessment and professional development for stakeholders in K-12 education, higher education, and Corporate America. Her research is focused upon the use of mixed methodologies to explore significant research questions in undergraduate, graduate, and professional engineering education, to integrate concepts from higher education and learning science into engineering education, and to develop and disseminate reliable and valid assessment tools for use across the engineering education continuum.

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Joyce B. Main Purdue University-Main Campus, West Lafayette (College of Engineering)

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Joyce B. Main is Assistant Professor of Engineering Education at Purdue University. She holds a Ph.D. in Learning, Teaching, and Social Policy from Cornell University, and an Ed.M. in Administration, Planning, and Social Policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Ebony Omotola McGee Vanderbilt University

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Ebony O. McGee is an Assistant Professor of Diversity and Urban Schooling at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College and a member of Scientific Careers Research and Development Group at Northwestern University. She received her Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from the University of Illinois at Chicago; and she was a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow and a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. As a former electrical engineer, she is concerned with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning and participation among historically marginalized students of color. Her research focuses on the role of racialized experiences and biases in STEM educational and career attainment, problematizing traditional notions of academic achievement and what is mean to be successful yet marginalized, and STEM identity and identity development in high-achieving students of color. She is currently the PI on two studies funded by NSF, the first of which investigates the causes behind why African Americans remain one of the most underrepresented racial groups in engineering faculty positions. The second study is working toward the design of a holistic racial and gender attentive mentoring program for engineering PhD students of color.

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Abstract

This paper presents the development of the Persistence of Engineers in the Academy Survey (PEAS). The work described here is part of a multi-year, mixed-methods research project that investigates the persistence of women of color faculty in engineering. Women are significantly underrepresented as faculty, especially in upper ranks and administration, in most science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. Research is needed to identify organizational barriers that impede the participation and advancement of women faculty (NSF, 2016). As one critical component of the PEAS, this paper details a procedure for the development of a scale to explore the perspectives of engineering faculty in the U.S. about ways that gender, race/ethnicity, and class affect their persistence in the academy. Intersectionality (Crenshaw, 1991) is used as a framework to guide the study design and data analysis.

Through the literature review, we identified eight factors related to motivation and work climate that may affect faculty persistence. Based on the intersectionality framework, two additional factors were considered to probe the effects of class on the persistence of faculty. We conducted several iterations of item development, along with the face and content validity analyses, and developed a total of 63 items for the 10 constructs. The first version of the PEAS was tested with data from 215 STEM faculty members at a Midwestern public university. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) identified 10 latent factors as we intended, but item level analyses using factor loadings suggested areas for item improvement. Therefore, another round of data collection using the PEAS with revised items is currently ongoing at two universities, one public and one private. Another EFA and confirmatory factor analysis will be applied to the new dataset to finalize the items and factor structure of the scale. This study is expected to contribute to the literature on equity and the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, and class in academic careers.

Aldridge, J., & Yoon, S. Y., & Cox, M. F., & Main, J. B., & McGee, E. O. (2019, June), Board 102: Development of the Persistence of Engineers in the Academy Survey (PEAS) Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32169

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015