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Building and Breaching Boundaries: an Intersectional Coherent Group Approach to Advancing Women Faculty in Engineering

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Women in Engineering Division Technical Session 4

Tagged Division

Women in Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30162

Download Count

34

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Paper Authors

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Coleen Carrigan California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Professor Coleen Carrigan is a feminist anthropologist and an Assistant Professor of Gender, Race, Culture, Science and Technology at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. She investigates the historical and cultural dimensions of underrepresented groups' participation in science, technology and engineering and the reasons why white males still dominate these fields.

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Saejin Kwak Tanguay University of Washington

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Saejin Kwak Tanguay is a Ph.D. Candidate in Multicultural Education at the University of Washington. Her research examines how educational policy & practice, curriculum, and instruction mediate cross-racial and cross-ethnic peer relations among students, and how these peer relations shape students of color's educational experiences, trajectories, and access to opportunities.

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Joyce Yen University of Washington

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Joyce Yen, Ph.D., is the Director of the ADVANCE Center for Institutional Change at the University of Washington where she focuses on advancing women and underrepresented minority faculty in STEM fields and leading faculty professional development programs. Her diversity and faculty work has received over $6.7 million in grant funding. She holds a M.S. and Ph.D. in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and B.S. in Mathematics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She was awarded the 2012 University of Washington David B. Thorud Leadership Award and the 2017 WEPAN Inclusive Culture and Equity Award.

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Julie Simmons Ivy North Carolina State University

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Julie Simmons Ivy is a Professor in the Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Fitts Faculty Fellow in Health Systems Engineering. She previously spent several years on the faculty of the Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. She received her B.S. and Ph.D. in Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan. She also received her M.S. in Industrial and Systems Engineering with a focus on Operations Research at Georgia Tech. She is President of the Health Systems Engineering Alliance (HSEA) Board of Directors. She is an active member of the Institute of Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS), Dr. Ivy served as the 2007 Chair (President) of the INFORMS Health Applications Society and is a past President for the INFORMS Minority Issues Forum. Her research interests are mathematical modeling of stochastic dynamic systems with emphasis on statistics and decision analysis as applied to health care, public health, and humanitarian logistics.

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Cara Margherio University of Washington

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Cara Margherio is a Senior Research Associate at the UW Center for Evaluation & Research for STEM Equity (CERSE). Cara serves as project manager for program evaluation on several NSF- and NIH-funded projects. Her research interests include community cultural wealth, counterspaces, peer mentoring, and institutional change.

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Eve A. Riskin University of Washington

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Eve Riskin received her BS degree in Electrical Engineering from
M.I.T. and her graduate degrees in EE from Stanford. Since 1990, she
has been in the EE Department at the University of Washington where
she is now Associate Dean of Diversity and Access in the College of
Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Director of the
ADVANCE Center for Institutional Change. With ADVANCE, she works on
mentoring and leadership development programs for women faculty in
STEM. She was awarded a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, a
Sloan Research Fellowship, the 2006 Hewlett-Packard Harriett B. Rigas Award,
and the 2018 ECEDHA Diversity Award. She is a Fellow of the IEEE.

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Christine S Grant North Carolina State University

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Dr. Christine S. Grant joined the NC State faculty in 1989 after completing her M.S. and Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology) and Sc.B. (Brown University) all in Chemical Engineering (ChE). One of less than 10 African-American women full ChE professors in the country, her research interests are in interfacial phenomena and recently biomedical systems. She is the first Associate Dean of Faculty Advancement in NC State’s College of Engineering. Awards/service include 2015 AAAS Mentor Award, Fellow in American Institute of Chemical Engineers Board of Directors, NSF Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Math and Engineering Mentoring, Council for Chemical Research Diversity Award. She is the founding director of the Promoting Underrepresented Presence on Science and Engineering Faculties (PURPOSE) Institute”. A certified coach, Grant consults and empowers STEM individuals at all levels in the academy towards excellence in career and professional development. Her workshops on mentoring and academic career development for NSF ADVANCE programs at Purdue, Cornell, Texas A&M, University of Toledo, UVA, Prairie View A&M, and the ADVANCE Annual PI meetings promote STEM faculty development while providing diverse role models for students. She has mentored and empowered hundreds of faculty, students and postdocs.

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M. Claire Horner-Devine University of Washington and Counterspace Consulting

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Dr. Claire Horner-Devine is the co-founder and co-director of three, federally funded, national programs (BRAINS, WEBS, and LATTICE) designed to accelerate and improve the career advancement of early-career women and researchers from underrepresented groups in STEM. She is also is the founder of Counterspace Consulting and creates professional development and leadership opportunities for STEM professionals, grounded in social science research and with equity, diversity and inclusion at their core. She has published this work in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, CBE – Life Sciences Education and Neuron.

Dr. Horner-Devine received her B.A from Princeton University and her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Stanford University and has published her work in community ecology, microbial ecology and conservation biology in journals such as Nature, Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Ecology. She worked as a faculty member in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington for almost a decade. She also served as Director of Leadership and Diversity in the College of the Environment at UW.

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Abstract

This paper draws on data from the NSF ADVANCE-funded LATTICE program (Launching Academics on the Tenure-Track: an Intentional Community in Engineering) to examine how an interdisciplinary and racially/ethnically diverse group of women worked across different social and professional identities to organize a workshop for early-career women faculty in Engineering and Computer Science. Using applied anthropological methods, we elucidate the social dynamics and power relations involved in forming a coherent group identity, and the boundaries we build and breach to advance a social and intellectual movement aimed at broadening participation in engineering disciplines. We ask: How do the organizers remain attentive to, negotiate, and effectively work across differences in social identities and disciplines? We also investigate the strategies of organizers use to foster solidarity among women working for the advancement of other women. In particular, we focus on how members communicated and collaborated across different racial, ethnic, and disciplinary identities to generate trust and enrich our commonalities, friendships, and shared personal and professional goals. Our analysis is not only intersectional, it also crosses the boundaries of the personal and professional, the individual and collective. We actively facilitate and explore the tensions that exist in these false binaries within the LATTICE coherent group. Our lived experiences and relationships as change agents in academia help to further elucidate the values, practices, relationships, and politics that reproduce white, male hegemony in engineering. Our findings provide guidelines for others who work across, with, and through various dimensions of difference in social, political, professional, and cultural identities to advance equity and inclusion in engineering fields.

Carrigan, C., & Tanguay, S. K., & Yen, J., & Ivy, J. S., & Margherio, C., & Riskin, E. A., & Grant, C. S., & Horner-Devine, M. C. (2018, June), Building and Breaching Boundaries: an Intersectional Coherent Group Approach to Advancing Women Faculty in Engineering Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30162

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