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Curricular Mapping and Indirect Assessment of Universidad de las Américas Puebla’s Engineering School Outcomes

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering Education Ties and Engineering Programs in the Middle East and Latin America

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

25.375.1 - 25.375.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21133

Download Count

25

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Paper Authors

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Lourdes Gazca Universidad de las Américas, Puebla

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Aurelio Lopez-Malo Universidad de las Américas, Puebla

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Aurelio Lopez-Malo is professor and Past Chair, Department of Chemical, Food, and Environmental Engineering at Universidad de las Américas, Puebla, in Mexico. He teaches food science and engineering related courses. His research interests include emerging technologies for food processing, natural antimicrobials, and active learning.

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Enrique Palou Universidad de las Américas, Puebla

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Enrique Palou is Director, Center for Science, Engineering, and Technology Education in the Department of Chemical, Food, and Environmental Engineering at Universidad de las Américas, Puebla, in Mexico. He teaches engineering, food science, and education-related courses. His research interests include emerging technologies for food processing, creating effective learning environments, using tablet PCs, and associated technologies to enhance the development of 21st century expertise in engineering students, and building rigorous research capacity in science, engineering, and technology education.

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Abstract

Curricular Mapping and Indirect Assessment of University ABC’s Engineering School OutcomesUniversity ABC (ABC) is a Mexican private institution of higher learning committed to first-class teaching, public service, research and learning in a wide range of academic disciplinesincluding business administration, the physical and social sciences, engineering, humanities, andthe arts [1]. Since 1959, the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Collegesand Schools (SACS) has accredited ABC in the United States. Every undergraduate engineeringprogram from ABC is accredited by the Consejo de Acreditación de la Enseñanza de laIngeniería (CACEI), which is the peer-accrediting agency of the US Accreditation Board forEngineering and Technology (ABET) in Mexico. Graduates of ABC’s Engineering School (ES)shall attain thirteen outcomes; eleven of them are ABET Criterion 3 (a-k) program outcomes,and the other two are as follows: “an ability to communicate effectively in English in writtenform” and “an ability to rationally use information and communication technologies as learningtools, and to find and manage important information”.As part of assessment efforts at ES, in 2009-2010 curricular mapping analyses were performedfor ES outcomes in each of the undergraduate engineering programs as well as a series ofsurveys were designed and implemented to assess ES outcomes with various stakeholders(faculty, students throughout the curricula, graduating seniors, alumni, and employers), regardingtheir perception about the importance of the thirteen outcomes and the progress made by ourstudents in achieving these outcomes. Engineering programs’ curricular mapping was carried outwith collaboration of the program faculty who were asked to rate for each of the courses theyteach the degree to which they are promoting the thirteen outcomes. Responding on a scale of 0to 3 whether they do not cover (0), initiate (1), develop (2), or emphasize (3) each outcome intheir classes. Faculty felt that the outcome that they best promote and emphasize throughout thecurriculum is “an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering”, whilethe outcome that they promote and emphasize less is “an ability to communicate effectively inEnglish in written form”.The five surveyed groups claim as one of the most important program outcomes “an ability tocommunicate effectively”. There are also two other outcomes that are considered very importantfor three stakeholder groups: “a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-longlearning” and “an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams”. From the responses receivedrelating to the progress of our students, stakeholder groups agree that major progress is achievedregarding “an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams”, “an ability to rationally useinformation and communication technologies as learning tools, and to find and manageimportant information”, and “a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-longlearning”. Current students felt that program outcomes are very important, assigning mean scoreshigher than 4.0 out of 5.0 points. Food engineering students were the only undergraduates thatclearly perceived a continuous improvement in their progress achieving ES outcomes from their1st through their 9th semester.[1] XXX (for blind review purposes)

Gazca, L., & Lopez-Malo, A., & Palou, E. (2012, June), Curricular Mapping and Indirect Assessment of Universidad de las Américas Puebla’s Engineering School Outcomes Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/21133

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