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Engineering Design Education For Integrated Product Realization

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Design Cognition

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

14.547.1 - 14.547.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/5754

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

author page

Mohamed El-Sayed Kettering University

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Engineering Design Education for Integrated Product Realization

Abstract

The term product realization has been used by engineers for the more than a decade to describe the outcome of production processes. While the use of the term, with this meaning, has been widely spread among engineers and researchers there has not been an in depth study for the relationship between realization and design. Considering that the term product realization means bringing a product to reality, which is the core of the full engineering process starting with design and development, there is a need to study how design education will be shaped if it was conducted as an integrated part of the product realization process. In this paper the realization process with its relation to design and design education is examined. The paper discusses the different domains of realization and their interactions. It also addresses the relationship between design, problem solving and research in the context of realization. The insights gained, from understanding design as a realization process, can guide engineering education in fostering creativity and identifying the required elements such as modeling and simulation. To illustrate the concepts, presented in the paper, several examples are included.

Introduction

Since the beginning of their life on earth humans have developed processes and Products, to utilize the physical world resources, for their own survival. As their understanding or realization of the physical world and themselves improved so did the processes and products they developed. It is the observation and learning, or in other words the enhanced realization, provided by the interaction with the physical reality that provided and still provide humans with great insights to develop their own processes and products. As a matter of fact humans have become very successful not only in creating their own processes and products but also in altering some the physical world’s processes and products as well.

When interacting with the physical world humans have used their own perception of it as their own reality. Each individual has his or her own perception of this reality. In order to understand physical reality and collectively share their perception of it humans have introduced a third domain known as the virtual world. It is a domain where perceptions, hypotheses, observations, imaginations etc are shared. It takes the form of simple arithmetic, to complicated mathematics, movies, novels, drawings, internet, digital and computational worlds etc. In the following the human interaction with these realities will be examined as it relates to design education.

Theory of Realization

The term product realization, which means bringing a product to being in physical reality, has been used by engineers for the more than a decade to describe the outcome of production or manufacturing processes. While the use of the term, with this meaning, has been widely spread among engineers and researchers there has not been an in depth study for the relationship between realization and design. By using the word realization, in product realization, to mean

El-Sayed, M. (2009, June), Engineering Design Education For Integrated Product Realization Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/5754

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