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Exploring What We Don't Know About Entrepreneurship Education for Engineers

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation Division – Epicenter Session

Tagged Division

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

27

Page Numbers

26.746.1 - 26.746.27

DOI

10.18260/p.24083

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24083

Download Count

240

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Paper Authors

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Sheri Sheppard Stanford University

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Sheri D. Sheppard, Ph.D., P.E., is professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. Besides teaching both undergraduate and graduate design and education related classes at Stanford University, she conducts research on engineering education and work-practices, and applied finite element analysis. From 1999-2008 she served as a Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, leading the Foundation’s engineering study (as reported in Educating Engineers: Designing for the Future of the Field). In addition, in 2003 Dr. Sheppard was named co-principal investigator on a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to form the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE), along with faculty at the University of Washington, Colorado School of Mines, and Howard University. More recently (2011) she was named as co-PI of a national NSF innovation center (Epicenter), and leads an NSF program at Stanford on summer research experiences for high school teachers. Her industry experiences includes engineering positions at Detroit's "Big Three:" Ford Motor Company, General Motors Corporation, and Chrysler Corporation.

At Stanford she has served a chair of the faculty senate, and is currently the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Education.

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Shannon Gilmartin Stanford University

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Helen L. Chen Stanford University

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Helen L. Chen is a research scientist in the Designing Education Lab in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Director of ePortfolio Initiatives in the Office of the Registrar at Stanford University. She is also a member of the research team in the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter). Helen earned her undergraduate degree from UCLA and her PhD in Communication with a minor in Psychology from Stanford University in 1998. Her current research interests include: 1) engineering and entrepreneurship education; 2) the pedagogy of ePortfolios and reflective practice in higher education; and 3) reimagining the traditional academic transcript.

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Mary E. Besterfield-Sacre University of Pittsburgh

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Dr. Mary Besterfield-Sacre is an Associate Professor and Fulton C. Noss Faculty Fellow in Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Director for the Engineering Education Research Center (EERC) in the Swanson School of Engineering, and serves as a Center Associate for the Learning Research and Development Center. Her principal research is in engineering education assessment, which has been funded by the NSF, Department of Ed, Sloan, EIF, and NCIIA. Dr. Sacre’s current research focuses on three distinct but highly correlated areas – innovative design and entrepreneurship, engineering modeling, and global competency in engineering. She is currently associate editor for the AEE Journal.

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Nathalie Duval-Couetil Purdue University, West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-0260-0208

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Nathalie Duval-Couetil is the Director of the Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program, Associate Director of the Burton D. Morgan Center, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Technology Leadership and Innovation at Purdue University. She is responsible for the launch and development of the university’s multidisciplinary undergraduate entrepreneurship program, which has involved over 5000 students from all majors since 2005. She has established entrepreneurship capstone, global entrepreneurship, and women and leadership courses and initiatives at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Prior to her work in academia, Nathalie spent several years in the field of market research and business strategy consulting in Europe and the United States with Booz Allen and Hamilton and Data and Strategies Group. She received a BA from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, an MBA from Babson College, and MS and PhD degrees from Purdue University. She currently serves on the board of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship in the role of Vice President for Research. She is also a Senior Research Advisor to the Stanford University Epicenter.

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Angela Shartrand VentureWell

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Angela Shartrand is Director of Research and Evaluation at VentureWell, a non-profit higher education network that helps emerging scientists and engineers launch products and ventures that improve life for people and the planet. Since 2005, she has contributed to the growth and development of VentureWell's entrepreneurship and innovation initiatives, which include grants, competitions, faculty development, innovator training, and network building. She has also collaborated on many NSF-funded projects that are advancing entrepreneurship education in STEM fields, including Epicenter and I-Corps(tm). She and her team are currently examining the experiences of innovators commercializing and scaling-up new technologies, products, and services, and are developing ways to assess the venture and product development status of innovation teams. She received her B.A. from Williams College, an Ed.M. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology from Boston College.

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Laurie Moore National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter)

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Laurie Moore is the communications manager for the NSF-funded Epicenter and leads the center's community outreach efforts. She manages the website and its content, social media accounts, media relations, email campaigns, and tells the stories of engineering faculty and students who exemplify the innovative, entrepreneurial spirit that defines the center. Laurie has worked for eight years as a writer and editor for web and print, with experience in website management and graphic design. Before joining Epicenter, she worked for the University of Southern California as the web editor for the USC Dornsife College.

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Emanuel Costache SageFox Consulting Group

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Since joining SageFox in 2009, Emanuel has worked on the evaluation team for a variety of NIH- and NSF-funded projects, including the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter). Emanuel also works closely with Epicenter's Fostering Innovative Generations Studies (FIGS) researchers and the Designing Education Lab at Stanford Univ. He lives in San Francisco, Calif.

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Andreea Mihaela Fintoc

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Qu Jin Stanford University

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Qu Jin is a postdoctoral scholar in the Designing Education Lab at Stanford University. She earned her Ph.D. degree in Engineering Education from Purdue University in 2013, M.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering from Purdue University in 2009, and B.S. degree in Material Science and Engineering from Tsinghua University in China in 2007. Her research interests focus on educational studies that can help improve teaching, learning, and educational policy decision makings using both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Her current research project in National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter) focuses on measuring engineering students’ entrepreneurial interests and related individual characteristics. Her Ph.D. dissertation involved using statistical modeling methods to explain and predict engineering students’ success outcomes, such as retention, academic performance, and graduation.

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Calvin Ling Stanford University

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Florian Michael Lintl Stanford University

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Florian is studying Environmental Planning and Ecological Engineering at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). His majors are Sustainable City Development, Renewable Energy, International Land Use Planning and Environmental Economics. He is also participant in the Entrepreneurial Qualification Program "Manage&More". This is a program of the Center for Innovation and Business Creation at the TU Munich (“UnternehmerTUM”) which supports Innovation and Start-Up Projects. While at UnternehmerTUM, Florian was involved in a marketing project for a tourism startup (Social Tourist) and consulting for another startup that monitors super lightweight structures (fos4x).
He joined the Designing Education Lab to learn more about entrepreneurial decision making for profit or non-profit organizations and social entrepreneurship in general.

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Leticia C. Britos Cavagnaro Stanford University

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Leticia Britos Cavagnaro, Ph.D., is Deputy Director of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter), an NSF-funded initiative to foster innovation and entrepreneurship in engineering education nationwide. She is also a lecturer at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school), where she teaches Stanford students of all disciplines how to build their creative confidence to become engines of innovation in their own lives, and as members of teams and organizations. She has a Ph.D. in Developmental Biology from Stanford's School of Medicine, and is a former member of the Research in Education & Design Lab (REDlab) at Stanford’s School of Education. Having witnessed the journey of students who are transformed by their experience at the d.school, bringing design thinking to more people beyond Stanford has become a priority for Leticia, and she has worked with hundreds of teachers and students of all ages, as well as corporate and non-profit leaders in the US and abroad. In the Summer of 2013, Leticia engaged thousands of people from over 130 countries in learning design thinking and applying the methodology to innovate in their contexts, via an experiential MOOC (http://novoed.com/designthinking).

Find out more about Leticia's work at:
http://epicenter.stanford.edu
http://dschool.stanford.edu/creativity-and-innovation-winter/
http://teachingcommons.stanford.edu/teaching-talk/design-thinking-action-lab-1

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Humera Fasihuddin VentureWell

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Anna K Breed

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Abstract

What we don’t know about entrepreneurship education for engineersWho better to answer the question that frames this paper than a group of engineering educators,educational researchers, practicing entrepreneurs and innovators, and engineering students? Such agroup was convened under the sponsorship of the NSF-funded National Center for EngineeringPathways to Innovation (Epicenter) in August of 2014 to examine and reflect on current knowledgeof students’ entrepreneurial development and pathways, entrepreneurship programming models, andthe efficacy of various curricular approaches. The event, known as the first “Epicenter ResearchSummit”, was co-hosted by scholars at Purdue University, Stanford University, and University ofPittsburgh; 70 attendees from 29 different institutions and organizations contributed to panel andposter sessions over two days. These sessions and the continuous dialogue, along with a series ofindividual and group exercises, allowed this community to identify gaps in knowledge abouteducational environments and pedagogies that support engineering students becoming creative,innovative and entrepreneurial thinkers. The gaps fall in three broad categories: 1. defining educational outcomes related to entrepreneurship education and linking these to broader calls for engineering education reform (i.e., the extent to which students develop skills as a result of entrepreneurship and innovation education that are aligned with those promoted in, for example, The Engineer of 2020 report; sample research questions are “To what extent does entrepreneurship education facilitate the development of creativity among engineering students who otherwise might not have the opportunity? What effect might this have on their professional trajectories? How can the community improve how creativity is assessed?”) 2. understanding student diversity in this still-emerging space (i.e., the extent to which varied life experiences, backgrounds, and identities are represented among engineering students involved in entrepreneurship education in many forms; sample research questions are “Do women, first-generation, and/or underrepresented racial/ethnic minority engineering students participate in entrepreneurship courses and activities at the same rate as do their peers? What motivates different types of students to engage in these experiences? Do they benefit from these activities in the same ways?”) 3. identifying the roles of contextual factors in influencing how entrepreneurship-related educational learning outcomes are prioritized and how entrepreneurship education could be developed in particular university or college settings (i.e., the extent to which departmental, institutional, and regional “ecosystems” influence a particular type of innovation and entrepreneurship curricular/co-curricular strategy, and/or how these contextual parameters influence students’ beliefs and actions directly; sample research questions are “To what extent do different types of engineering majors (e.g., electrical, mechanical, biomedical, etc.) promote a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship in their curricula, with what effect on students’ plans, perceptions, and knowledge of, for instance, the innovation process? What are the implications for change initiatives within universities that begin at the student-level?”)In this paper we describe the range of research questions per category that emerged from theSummit, connect these questions to prior work (on which answers can be built), and begin toprioritize which gaps may be most important to address in order to strengthen engineering students’access to and experiences surrounding entrepreneurship and innovation education.

Sheppard, S., & Gilmartin, S., & Chen, H. L., & Besterfield-Sacre, M. E., & Duval-Couetil, N., & Shartrand, A., & Moore, L., & Costache, E., & Fintoc, A. M., & Jin, Q., & Ling, C., & Lintl, F. M., & Britos Cavagnaro, L. C., & Fasihuddin, H., & Breed, A. K. (2015, June), Exploring What We Don't Know About Entrepreneurship Education for Engineers Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24083

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015