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Feedback Through Critical Indicators Of Student Performance: Contributing To The Assessment Of High School Education

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Foster Excellence

Tagged Division

Minorities in Engineering

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

13.608.1 - 13.608.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3882

Download Count

15

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Paper Authors

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David Gonzalez-Barreto University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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GONZÁLEZ-BARRETO, DAVID R., PhD. He is Professor of Industrial Engineering and Coordinator of Institutional Research of the Office of Institutional Research and Planning of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. He is interested in institutional research, specifically in the areas of admissions, student access for underrepresented groups and student success.

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biography

Antonio Gonzalez-Quevedo University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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GONZÁLEZ-QUEVEDO, ANTONIO A., PhD. He is Professor of Civil Engineering and Director of the Office of Institutional Research and Planning of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. He is interested in physical planning and institutional research, specifically in the areas of admissions, assessment of student learning and student engagement.

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Sonia Bartolomei-Suarez University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez

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SUÁREZ-BARTOLOMEI, SONIA, PhD. She is Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the School of Engineering and Professor of Industrial Engineering. She is interested in engineering education research, specifically in the areas of admissions, access for women and minorities.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Feedback through critical indicators of student performance: contributing to the assessment of high school education

Abstract

The data obtained and developed by the Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIIP) of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM) since its foundation in 2001 has allowed for the creation of a strong student information system and the development of a series of critical indicators (CI) of their performance. This database includes the student performance at the high school level: high school grade point average (GPA) and scores of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) and their performance at the university level (e.g., grades, GPA, retention and graduation rates, among others.)

This work presents a model for the development of a feedback mechanism to the high schools that send students to our Engineering School based on the critical indicators. This effort will promote continuous improvement at the high school level and at the university level. If the feedback mechanism shows a major problem for specific academic areas, the university and the school can develop strategies for improving the teaching-learning process for the specific subjects. The critical indicators used in the model will be analyzed for the high schools by geographic region and type of school (private or public). Initially the critical indicators will include: high school GPA, the ratio between students applying and students admitted per high school, retention and graduation rates, and grades obtained in general education courses such as, Mathematics, English, and Spanish, among others. The objective of this feedback system will be to influence positively the high schools in producing better educated students who can succeed in the engineering college of our university. The expected outcome is that both educational systems, the university and the high school, will improve through this process.

Background

Since 2001, the Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM) maintains data on student academic performance (SAP). With this data, the office can develop a series of critical indicators. With these critical indicators a system can be develop to relate SAP with the high school of origin of our students. This system will help us identify the high schools that do a good job in preparing their students for our university and those that require improving the teaching methods. This system will permit the identification of the high schools on a regional and island wide basis.

It should be noted that other input variables and their predictive capabilities for university success have been examined by several authors These include studies of students’ high school rank and a measure of the quality of his/her high school (1), pre-college preparation, recruitment programs, admissions policies, financial assistance, academic intervention programs (2), among others.

Preliminary development of the core idea presented in this paper was discussed by the authors in a previous conference. In this case the concept of an expected loss function using as variables the graduation GPA, average time to degree, and graduation rates were used to rate the high

Gonzalez-Barreto, D., & Gonzalez-Quevedo, A., & Bartolomei-Suarez, S. (2008, June), Feedback Through Critical Indicators Of Student Performance: Contributing To The Assessment Of High School Education Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3882

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