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FLC (E^2)T: A Faculty Learning Community on Effective (and Efficient) Teaching

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NEE 2 - Strategies to Improve Teaching Effectiveness

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

40

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32848

Download Count

12

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Paper Authors

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Dustyn Roberts P.E. Temple University

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Dustyn Roberts received her B.S. in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University (2003), her M.S. in Biomechanics & Movement Science (2004) from the University of Delaware, and her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering (2014) from New York University. She is passionate about translational research and engineering education.

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Joshua A. Enszer University of Delaware

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Dr. Joshua Enszer is an associate professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware. He has taught core and elective courses across the curriculum, from introduction to engineering science and material and energy balances to process control, capstone design, and mathematical modeling of chemical and environmental systems. His research interests include technology and learning in various incarnations: electronic portfolios as a means for assessment and professional development, implementation of computational tools across the chemical engineering curriculum, and game-based learning.

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Allen A. Jayne P.E. University of Delaware

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Allen Jayne is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Delaware. He possesses 28 years of consulting experience in the area of building structural design. In 2016 he was the recipient of the University of Delaware Excellence in Teaching Award.

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Sarah Ilkhanipour Rooney University of Delaware

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Sarah I. Rooney is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program in the Biomedical Engineering department at the University of Delaware, where she seeks to bring evidence-based teaching practices to the undergraduate curriculum. She received her B.S.E. (2009) and M.S.E. (2010) in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and her Ph.D. (2015) in Bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Amy Trauth University of Delaware Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5146-592X

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Amy Trauth, Ph.D., is the Senior Associate Director of Science Education at the University of Delaware's Professional Development Center for Educators. In her role, Amy works collaboratively with K-12 science and engineering teachers to develop and implement standards-based curricula and assessments. She also provides mentoring and coaching and co-teaching support to K-12 teachers across the entire trajectory of the profession. Her research focuses on teacher education, classroom assessment, and P-16 environmental and engineering education.

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Andrew Novocin University of Delaware

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James Atlas University of Delaware

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Abstract

(Work in Progress) The paper is the result of a Faculty Learning Community (FLC) within the college of engineering at a large mid-Atlantic university. The FLC was initiated to create a series of short guides on effective teaching practices that distill the literature on various topics into actionable steps any faculty member (particularly new faculty or research-intensive faculty) can implement. The FLC consisted of members from all departments within the college of engineering and a single colleague from the college of education with special expertise in professional development. All engineering FLC members were non-tenure-track (NTT) faculty with workloads that consisted primarily of teaching.

The FLC met every 2-4 weeks for most of the 2017-2018 academic year. An initial list of guides was proposed at the beginning of the project that grew into 12 total: Inclusive Teaching, Active Learning, Motivation & Engagement, Mindset, Rubrics, Learning Objectives, Syllabus Creation, Assessment, Inductive Teaching, Damage Control, Retrieval Practice, and Teams. Each engineering FLC member led the development of 2-3 of these guides and was responsible for moving them through 5 phases (with feedback incorporated between each phase): 1) first draft, 2) reviewed with another engineering FLC member, 3) reviewed with education FLC member, 4) reviewed with a faculty member outside the FLC group, and 5) final draft. This paper is marked as a work in progress because it turned out that phase 4 was the bottle neck so all of the guides are still a work in progress.

This work is directly informed by both the scholarship of teaching and learning and discipline-based education research in the engineering and computer science disciplines and seeks to propagate this work across the faculty for the ultimate benefit of students. From the self-determination theory of motivation to review articles demonstrating the effectiveness of active learning in STEM disciplines, many evidence-based, effective teaching practices and frameworks are distilled in these guides. References and resources are be provided in each guide that serve to both indicate the sources of the information in the guides and point to further reading and resources for professional development for interested faculty. (The guides will be attached as appendices to the full paper.) (Preferred format: paper presentation)

Roberts, D., & Enszer, J. A., & Jayne, A. A., & Rooney, S. I., & Trauth, A., & Novocin, A., & Atlas, J. (2019, June), FLC (E^2)T: A Faculty Learning Community on Effective (and Efficient) Teaching Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32848

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015