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Impact of a Modeling Intervention in an Introductory Programming Course

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

The Best of First Year Programs: Best Paper Session

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

23

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32918

Download Count

5

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Paper Authors

biography

Kelsey Joy Rodgers Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach

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Kelsey Rodgers is an Assistant Professor in the Engineering Fundamentals Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. She teaches a MATLAB programming course to mostly first-year engineering students. She primarily investigates how students develop mathematical models and computational models. She also conducts research around effective feedback and nanotechnology education. She graduated from the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University with a doctorate in engineering education. She previous conducted research in Purdue University's First-Year Engineering Program with the Network for Nanotechnology (NCN) Educational Research team, the Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs) Educational Research team, and a few fellow STEM education graduates for an obtained Discovery, Engagement, and Learning (DEAL) grant. Prior to attending Purdue University, she graduated from Arizona State University with her B.S.E. in Engineering from the College of Technology and Innovation, where she worked on a team conducting research on how students learn LabVIEW through Disassemble, Analyze, Assemble (DAA) activities.

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Jaqi C. McNeil University of Louisville Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6133-4467

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J.C. McNeil is an Assistant Professor for the Department of Engineering Fundamentals at University of Louisville. Research interests include diversity in engineering, persistence, retention, and transitions to and from co-op experiences. Contact email: j.mcneil@louisville.edu

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Matthew A. Verleger Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach

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Matthew Verleger is an Associate Professor of Engineering Fundamentals at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida. His research interests are focused on using action research methodologies to develop immediate, measurable improvements in classroom instruction and the use of Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs) in teaching students about engineering problem solving. Dr. Verleger is an active member of ASEE. He also serves as the developer and site manager for the Model-Eliciting Activities Learning System (MEALearning.com), a site designed for implementing, managing, and researching MEAs in large classes.

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Farshid Marbouti San Jose State University

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Farshid Marbouti is an Assistant Professor of General (interdisciplinary) Engineering at San Jose State University (SJSU). He is currently the chair of SJSU Senate Student Success Committee. Farshid completed his Ph.D. in Engineering Education at Purdue University. His research interests center on First-Year Engineering student success and engineering design.

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Abstract

This complete research paper describes the impact of a modeling intervention on first-year engineering students’ modeling skills in an introductory computer programming course. Five sections of the first-year engineering introductory programming course at a private, STEM+Business institution were revised to center around modeling concepts. These five sections made up the experimental group for this study. The comparison group consisted of four sections of the course that were not revised. Students in all these sections were given two different versions of a modeling problem two times in the semester to test their progress in gaining modeling skills. Each version required two submissions – a written solution and a coded solution. The assessment of these four submissions based on the three established dimensions of modeling were quantitatively analyzed in this study. The three dimensions within mathematical modeling that were the focus of this study were mathematical model complexity, modifiability, and reusability. Mathematical model complexity is being able to address the complexity of the problem. Modifiability addresses the generalizability of the model solution. Reusability is showing an understanding of the problem and the user. Statistical analysis showed that students in the experimental group had more gains in their demonstrated modeling abilities across all three dimensions than the students in the comparison group. This study demonstrated that intentional and explicit instructional strategies targeting model development resulted in greater gains in students’ demonstrated modeling skills and both their written and coded solutions to a complex modeling problem.

Rodgers, K. J., & McNeil, J. C., & Verleger, M. A., & Marbouti, F. (2019, June), Impact of a Modeling Intervention in an Introductory Programming Course Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32918

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