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Integration Of Optical Diagnostic Techniques Into The Teaching Of The Thermal And Fluid Sciences Laboratory Course

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

4.333.1 - 4.333.15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8077

Download Count

48

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Paper Authors

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Luiz Lourenco

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Farrukh Alvi

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Chiang Shih

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2526

Integration of Optical Diagnostic Techniques into the Teaching of the Thermal and Fluid Sciences Laboratory Course

Chiang Shih, Luiz Lourenco and Farrukh Alvi Department of Mechanical Engineering FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Florida A&M University and Florida State University

Abstract

Visual presentation has always played an important role in teaching thermal and fluid related courses because "seeing is believing". However, traditional visualization techniques do not readily provide quantitative information about the flow field of interest, therefore, these techniques have primarily been used for qualitative demonstrations. In the current paper, we illustrate by example, the integration and use of two quantitative visualization/image-processing techniques into an undergraduate Thermal and Fluid sciences laboratory (TFSL) course. First, the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique is used to provide detailed whole-field velocity measurement. Sample projects include the flow-field characterization of a turbulent wake behind a circular cylinder and the droplet injection process of a Hewlett-Packard inkjet printhead. Second, the Laser Speckle Displacement (LSD) method is used to measure the density/temperature variation of selected flow fields, such as the shock-cell structure of a supersonic jet. Several sample projects involve the use of these two techniques are described in the paper. All laboratory manuals are documented in html format and made available to students before the experiments. Students are required to acquire and process PIV/speckle images and compare the processed data with other theoretical and experimental results in their laboratory reports. In our opinion, by taking advantage of the visual appeal of flow visualization techniques together with the ability to provide quantitative measurements, the integration of the advanced optical diagnostic techniques into the Thermal and Fluid Sciences Laboratory not only enhances students' understanding of the subject but also stimulate their interests in this discipline.

Introduction

"Thermal and Fluid Sciences" are among the most difficult curricula for undergraduate engineering students. A primary reason is the difficulty in conceptually visualizing thermal and fluid behaviors because most fluids are transparent and their motions and the associated thermal processes are invisible to human. Consequently, visualization methods usually play an important role in teaching thermal and fluid related courses because "seeing is believing". However, traditional visualization techniques do not readily provide quantitative information about the flow field of interest, therefore, they have mainly been used for the purpose of demonstration and their results can not effectively be correlated to the available theoretical and analytical solutions. In light of this, we propose to integrate two quantitative visualization/image-processing techniques into the teaching of an undergraduate thermal and fluid science laboratory (TFSL) course. Moreover, the visualization-based courseware produced in the image-processing

Lourenco, L., & Alvi, F., & Shih, C. (1999, June), Integration Of Optical Diagnostic Techniques Into The Teaching Of The Thermal And Fluid Sciences Laboratory Course Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/8077

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