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Investigating Computational Thinking Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Pre-Service Elementary Teachers

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Engineering Education Graduate Research Consortium (EEGRC) Poster Session

Tagged Division

Student

Page Count

2

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30721

Download Count

37

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Paper Authors

biography

Erdogan Kaya University of Nevada, Las Vegas Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3211-3259

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Kaya is a PhD student in science education at University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is working as a research assistant and teaching science methods courses. Prior to beginning the PhD program, he received his MS degree in computer science and engineering and holds a BS degree in chemical engineering. He taught K-12 STEM+CS for seven years. Additionally, he coached robotics teams and was awarded several grants that promote Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and Computer Science(CS) education. He is also interested in improving STEM+CS education for minorities. He has been volunteering in many education outreach programs including Science Fair and Robotics programs such as First Robotics competitions. Areas of research interest include engineering education, STEM+CS, and robotics in K-12 education. Kaya advocates his view that research, teaching and learning are best practiced as a unified enterprise that benefits students and society. He has received numerous teaching awards as well as grants for his research from several foundations. Kaya is an active member of AERA, ASEE, ASTE, NARST, NSTA, and CSTA, has presented at over 15 conferences, published in ranked journals (e.g. Journal of College Science Teaching), reviewed conference proposals (e.g ASEE).

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Ezgi Yesilyurt University of Nevada, Las Vegas Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1444-1048

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Ezgi Yesilyurt is a PhD student in curriculum and instruction/science education at University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She is working as a graduate assistant in an NSF funded grant project in which she assumed major responsibilities such as data collection, data analysis, design and delivery of teacher professional development workshops in the grant project. Also, she is currently teaching science methods courses. She received her MS degree and BS degree in elementary science education. She participated European Union Projects in which she conducted series of professional development programs for in-service science teachers. Areas of research interest are engineering education, inquiry learning, and evolution education.

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Anna Danielle Newley

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Anna Newley received a B.A. degree in Elementary Education from Arizona State University. She was an employee with the Tempe Elementary School District as a kindergarten, and second grade teacher, and instructional assistant until 2012. From 2012 to the current, she has been employed with the Sonoran Schools District. Presently, at Sonoran Science Academy-Phoenix, she is a fifth grade teacher. She is the contact for several grants awarded to the school. Mrs. Newley coaches the exploratory robotics club for grades 5-8, the Elementary Science Olympiad team, and the competitive high school robotics team, FTC. She contributed to international published papers, national proceedings, and is the process of writing several children's books. This summer she will present a workshop on robotics for elementary school students.

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Hasan Deniz University of Nevada Las Vegas

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Hasan Deniz is an Associate Professor of Science Education at University of Nevada Las Vegas. He teaches undergraduate, masters, and doctoral level courses in science education program at University of Nevada Las Vegas. His research agenda includes epistemological beliefs in science and evolution education. He is recently engaged in professional development activities supported by several grants targeting to increase elementary teachers’ knowledge and skills to integrate science, language arts, and engineering education within the context of Next Generation Science Standards.

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Abstract

Bandura defines self-efficacy beliefs as awareness of the individual’s potential and capabilities to accomplish a goal. Self-efficacy belief of teachers is a significant identifier of teachers’ performance and motivation in teaching the specific content successfully; however, K-12 science teachers’ computational thinking self-efficacy beliefs are rarely discussed. Additionally, providing professional development opportunities or modifying current science teaching methods courses play a crucial role in improving teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs. With the release of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), assessing K-12 science teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs in computational thinking is an important research gap to study. Participating pre-service elementary teachers enrolled in an undergraduate elementary science teaching methods course during spring 2018 semester in a southwestern state university to program educational robots, code visual block based programs, and solve puzzles of Zoombinis video game by following the NGSS Computational Thinking practices. We administered a computational thinking self-efficacy survey at the beginning and end of the related unit (i.e. the intervention). In this paper, we report the impact of the intervention on self-efficacy beliefs of pre-service elementary science teachers. We used SPSS Language to analyse our quantitative results. We performed dependent t-test for the two self-efficacy beliefs subscales, Personal Computational Thinking Teaching Efficacy (PCTTE) and Computational Thinking Teaching Outcome Expectancy (CTTOE), to measure if there is a significant difference in self-efficacy beliefs prior and at the end of the course training. Furthermore, based on the results of our exploratory research with pre-service elementary teachers, we proposed implications of the study for K-12 self-efficacy and computational thinking education research. Keywords: Computational Thinking, video games, robotics, coding, self-efficacy beliefs, NGSS, elementary, science teaching methods course, pre-service teachers, engineering, K-12

Kaya, E., & Yesilyurt, E., & Newley, A. D., & Deniz, H. (2018, June), Investigating Computational Thinking Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Pre-Service Elementary Teachers Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30721

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