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Observing Motor Learning and Control through Juggling and Motion Analysis: A Collaboration Between Dynamics and Kinesiology Students

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Conference

2019 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting

Location

California State University, Los Angeles , California

Publication Date

April 4, 2019

Start Date

April 4, 2019

End Date

April 6, 2019

Conference Session

PSW Section Meeting Papers - Disregard start and end time - for online paper access only

Tagged Topic

Pacific Southwest Section Meeting Paper Submissions

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31839

Download Count

2

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Paper Authors

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Jay Tyler Davis II California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo

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Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

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Sonya Dick

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Sonya Dick is a Senior Mechanical Engineering Student at California Polytechnic State University - SLO. This is her second year working at the Human Motion Biomechanics Lab. As a research assistant, she helps create and teach interdisciplinary laboratories for undergraduate kinesiology and engineering students. Her work also involves creating simulations of a wide range of devices for the use of educational modules.

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Brian P. Self California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Brian Self obtained his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Engineering Mechanics from Virginia Tech, and his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of Utah. He worked in the Air Force Research Laboratories before teaching at the U.S. Air Force Academy for seven years. Brian has taught in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo since 2006. During the 2011-2012 academic year he participated in a professor exchange, teaching at the Munich University of Applied Sciences. His engineering education interests include collaborating on the Dynamics Concept Inventory, developing model-eliciting activities in mechanical engineering courses, inquiry-based learning in mechanics, and design projects to help promote adapted physical activities. Other professional interests include aviation physiology and biomechanics.

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Bradley Wash California Polytechnic University, SLO

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Julia Holton California Polytechnic State University: Department of Kinesiology and Public Health

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Abstract

I intend to follow up with a full paper for this abstract. Motor learning and control are critical elements in kinesiology studies, however, there is a lack of available methods for producing numerical data that can be used to understand motor skills. One way to achieve this is through the use of live motion capture technology. Through utilizing motion capture, kinesiology students are able to review real-time footage of juggling. We allowed these students to collaborate with engineering dynamics students in order to analyze quantified data relating to the kinetics and kinematics of this activity. The purpose of this paper is to observe the effects of exposing undergraduate kinesiology students to motion capture technology in order to grasp concepts of motor control, along with allowing engineering dynamics students to have the opportunity to use data from a real life situation to calculate variables. The juggling experiment allowed engineering students to observe real life situations to calculate variables. The experiment allowed kinesiology students to observe variance in novice and expert jugglers, as well as learn about motion capture and analysis. Initial juggling trials were filmed using motion capture. After the initial trials, kinesiology students were then given six weeks to practice juggling, and then attempted a second trial in order to examine any trends in learning. Engineering dynamics students were then given the task of analyzing variables using the data produced. They calculated elbow forces and moments from the data, along with the kinetic energy of the lower arm of the jugglers. The dynamics students somewhat struggled to develop a quantifiable measure for motor learning. In a post activity survey, 72.22% of kinesiology students said that incorporating the biomechanics lab into their assignment helped them to learn the material in their course, while 83% of kinesiology students said that the biomechanics lab assignment should be included into future sections of the course.

Davis, J. T., & Dick, S., & Self, B. P., & Wash, B., & Holton, J. (2019, April), Observing Motor Learning and Control through Juggling and Motion Analysis: A Collaboration Between Dynamics and Kinesiology Students Paper presented at 2019 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting, California State University, Los Angeles , California. https://peer.asee.org/31839

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