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Psychological Considerations In Teaching Engineering: An Ethical Mandate To Produce Responsible Engineers.

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering Ethics IV

Tagged Division

Engineering Ethics

Page Count

19

Page Numbers

13.1013.1 - 13.1013.19

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4039

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

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B. Kyun Lee LeTourneau University

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B. KYUN LEE is a professor in the School of Engineering and Engineering Technology at LeTourneau University, where he taught since 1988. He received his B.S. degree from Young Nam University, M.S. and PH.D. from Oregon State University in mechanical engineering. Prior to joining LeTourneau University, he was a research and development engineer at Hyundai Motor Company. His professional interests include system dynamics, control, and applied mechanics. Email: kyunlee@letu.edu

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Paul Leiffer

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PAUL R. LEIFFER, LeTourneau University
Paul R. Leiffer is a professor in the School of Engineering and Engineering Technology at LeTourneau University, where he has taught since 1979. He received his B.S.E.E. from the State University of New York at Buffalo and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Drexel University. Prior to joining the faculty at LeTourneau, he was involved in cardiac cell research at the University of Kansas Medical Center. His professional interests include bioinstrumentation, digital signal processing, and engineering ethics. Email: paulleiffer@letu.edu

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R. William Graff LeTourneau University

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R. WILLIAM GRAFF is a professor in the School of Engineering and Engineering Technology at LeTourneau University, where he taught since 1975. He received his B.S., M.S., and PH.D. from Purdue University in electrical engineering. Prior to joining LeTourneau University, he was assistant professor of electrical engineering at Drexel University for six years, and at Wilkes College for two years. His professional interests include antennas, microwaves, plasma, and ethics. Email: billgraff@letu.edu

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Psychological Considerations in Engineering Teaching: An Ethical Mandate to Produce Responsible Engineers.

Introduction

Engineering faculty members have an ethical mandate to produce responsible engineering graduates. Faculty in engineering are required by our codes of ethics to "hold paramount the safety, health, and welfare of the public" by carefully preparing future engineers. Faculty are required to "act as faithful agents for their employers," properly serving the university, which provides education for the students. We are required "to issue truthful statements," which would include correct technical information. Our graduates must be technically competent and ethical (basic ABET outcomes) as well as well-prepared for the workplace with a readiness to work.

Engineering faculty therefore must • communicate correct and relevant information • communicate in a way that is understandable • encourage and model ethical behavior, and prepare students for the “real world,” the actual workplace expectations they will face.

The behavioral and psychological perspective of our students should be a consideration in engineering education. The influence from the trends in the twenty first century both to students and professors can be identified. It is necessary, therefore, to consider the psychological aspects of students in order to produce responsible engineers for the twenty first century.

In this paper, in order to understand the psychological roles in engineering classes, a survey of engineering students is given and analyzed. Suggestions and discussion that can be adapted to engineering classes are presented.

Generation Y Problem

Companies tell us that they want to hire graduates who have technical expertise, good communication skills, professional ethics, and team player attitudes. They also look for graduates who are self-motivated, flexible, and possess a strong “work ethic” (desire to work.) The latter three qualities may be more “caught than taught.”

“Generation Y, also known as the millennium generation, was born between 1978 and 2000. They are the largest generation to enter the workforce since the “baby boomers,” who are now set to retire. Within a few short years Generation Y will make up the largest segment of the working population.”1 Various writers have indicated that the current group of graduates is not prepared to work. According to the literature, current students are the most media-savvy and computer-literate generation yet seen. They have grown up with the internet, with cell phones, video games, and fast-paced television and video. They are very skilled at multitasking.

Lee, B. K., & Leiffer, P., & Graff, R. W. (2008, June), Psychological Considerations In Teaching Engineering: An Ethical Mandate To Produce Responsible Engineers. Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4039

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