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Redesigning A First Year, First Semester Introductory Ie Course To Use Active And Cooperative Learning

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Innovative Teaching Methods in Industrial Engineering

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

8.979.1 - 8.979.15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12502

Download Count

18

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Paper Authors

author page

Manuel Rossetti

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2357

Redesigning a First-Year, First Semester Introductory IE Course to Use Active and Cooperative Learning

Manuel D. Rossetti, Ph.D. P. E., Merrisa Purnomo University of Arkansas

Abstract

Active and cooperative learning methods recognize that the passive model of the typical college lecture does not work for many students. Instead, active and cooperative learning focuses on the premise that the students can learn best by doing and working with each other. Traditionally structured class periods imply that students listen to a professor lecture for about an hour. Cooperative learning can replace some of that lecture time with methods designed to get students actively involved during the class period. This paper presents the use of active and cooperative learning techniques applied to a first-year, first semester of principles of industrial engineering course. In this course, students are introduced to engineering problem solving, engineering design, and industrial engineering topic areas. In addition, this course provides introductory skills in computer technology and provides an opportunity for first-year students to get acclimated to the university within a supportive environment. Tips and examples for how to transform a standard lecture into a lecture based on cooperative exercises are given and the authors’ experiences with these techniques are detailed. Examples include introductory coverage of quality control, engineering economics, material handling, manufacturing systems, and methods analysis. In addition, potential projects for the course will be discussed.

Introduction

This paper discusses how to implement active and cooperative learning methods within a first- year, first semester Industrial Engineering course. Active and cooperative learning methods recognize that the passive model of the typical college lecture does not work for many students. Instead, active and cooperative learning is based on the premise that students can learn best by doing and working with each other. Active learning involves four major elements: talking/listening, writing, reading, and reflecting. (Meyers and Jones (1993)). Cooperative learning involves active group work that involves building interdependence, accountability, collaborative skills, and reflection. Reflection is achieved by students teaching and explaining material to each other, and by self/group evaluation. More detail on active and collaborative learning techniques can be found at reference [2] and [8].

Active and cooperative learning has been proven to be an effective technique for enhancing student learning and improving student retention through its supportive structured group work. An extensive analysis by Johnson, Johnson, and Smith (1998) revealed that cooperative learning has been extensively analyzed and proven to be effective. Their meta-analysis of the educational

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Rossetti, M. (2003, June), Redesigning A First Year, First Semester Introductory Ie Course To Use Active And Cooperative Learning Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12502

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