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The Use Of Piezoelectric Materials In Smart Structures

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Lab Experiments in Materials Science

Page Count

6

Page Numbers

8.1182.1 - 8.1182.6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/11820

Download Count

15

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Paper Authors

author page

N. Sundaresan

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Devdas Pai

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3264

The Use of Piezoelectric Materials in Smart Structures

D. M. Pai 1 and N. R. Sundaresan2 1 Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures 2 Summer Research Student, NASA Center for Aerospace Research Department of Mechanical Engineering North Carolina A&T State University Greensboro, NC 27411

Abstract A piezoelectric material is basically a ceramic that outputs a voltage upon being mechanically strained. Sensors made of this material are sensitive enough to generate signals when subjected to low-amplitude mechanical waves such as sound waves traveling through solids. This makes them candidate materials for all kinds of exciting applications. For example, sensors mounted on a wing surface could detect ice formation on the wing using surface active waves. Since the velocity of sound in a given medium is a function of temperature, such sensors are also being used to actually measure temperature. It is important for students to be aware of this new generation of materials and to be familiar with the use of these materials for measuring fundamental quantities such as the velocity of sound. This experiment has been designed for use in an introductory mechanical or materials engineering instrumentation lab. Initial setup (after procuring all the materials) should take the lab instructor about 2 hours. A single measurement can be initiated and saved to disk in less than 3 minutes, allowing for all the students in a typical lab section to take their own data rather than share a single set of data for the entire class. This experiment is offered to a sophomore-level laboratory class in mechanical engineering that focuses on measurements, instrumentation and manufacturing and addresses the first two topics in that course.

Introduction A piezoelectric material is basically a ceramic that outputs a voltage upon being mechanically strained. Sensors made of this material are sensitive enough to generate signals when subjected to low-amplitude mechanical waves such as sound waves traveling through solids. This makes them candidate materials for all kinds of exciting applications. For example, sensors mounted on a wing surface could detect ice formation on the wing using surface active waves. Since the velocity of sound in a given medium is a function of temperature, such sensors are also being used to actually measure temperature. It is important for students to be aware of this new generation of materials and to be familiar with the use of these materials for measuring fundamental quantities such as the velocity of sound. This experiment has been designed for use in an introductory mechanical or materials engineering instrumentation lab. Initial setup (after procuring all the materials) should take the lab instructor about 2 hours. A single measurement can be initiated and saved to disk in less than 3 minutes, allowing for all the students in a typical lab section to take their own data rather than share a single set of data for the entire class.

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Sundaresan, N., & Pai, D. (2003, June), The Use Of Piezoelectric Materials In Smart Structures Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/11820

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