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University, Community College, and Industry Partnership: Revamping Robotics Education to Meet 21st Century Workforce Needs – NSF-sponsored Project Final Report

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Academe/Industry Collaboration

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33487

Download Count

7

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Paper Authors

biography

Aleksandr Sergeyev Michigan Technological University

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Aleksandr Sergeyev is currently a
Professor in the Electrical Engineering
Technology program in the
School of Technology at Michigan Technological
University. Dr. Aleksandr
Sergeyev earned his bachelor degree in
Electrical Engineering at Moscow University
of Electronics and Automation in
1995. He obtained the Master degree
in Physics from Michigan Technological
University in 2004 and the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering
from Michigan Technological University in 2007.
Dr. Aleksandr Sergeyev’s research interests include high
energy laser propagation through the turbulent atmosphere,
developing advanced control algorithms for wavefront sensing
and mitigating effects of the turbulent atmosphere, digital
inline holography, digital signal processing, and laser spectroscopy. Dr. Sergeyev is a member of ASEE, IEEE, SPIE and is actively involved in promoting engineering education.

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Mark Bradley Kinney West Shore Community College

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Mark Kinney serves as the Vice President for Academics and Student Services at West Shore Community College in Scottville, MI. Formerly, he was the Dean for Business and Technology at Bay College in Escanaba, MI. He has successfully received over $2 million in grants throughout his career, which have been used to transform the technical education his institution provides. Most recently, Mark successfully authored an OER Degree Initiative grant through Achieving the Dream to develop a complete degree pathway using nothing but open educational resources. Mark also served on the development committee for the Voluntary Framework of Accountability, an initiative of the American Association of Community Colleges. Mark has a passion for rural education and completed his dissertation on the roles of rural educators and rural community colleges, and believes this is an underrepresented segment of our national higher education system.

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Scott A. Kuhl Michigan Technological University

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Scott Kuhl is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Cognitive & Learning Sciences at Michigan Technological University. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah in 2009. He has been the faculty advisor for Husky Game Development Enterprise since Spring 2010. His research interests include immersive virtual environments, head-mounted displays, spatial perception, and robotics education. A link to his web page can be found at http://www.cs.mtu.edu/.

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Nasser Alaraje Michigan Technological University

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Dr. Alaraje is a Professor and Program Chair of Electrical Engineering Technology in the School of Technology at Michigan Tech. Prior to his faculty appointment, he was employed by Lucent Technologies as a hardware design engineer, from 1997- 2002, and by vLogix as chief hardware design engineer, from 2002-2004. Dr. Alaraje’s research interests focus on processor architecture, System-on-Chip design methodology, Field-Programmable Logic Array (FPGA) architecture and design methodology, Engineering Technology Education, and hardware description language modeling. Dr. Alaraje is a 2013-2014 Fulbright scholarship recipient at Qatar University, where he taught courses on Embedded Systems. Additionally, Dr. Alaraje is a recipient of an NSF award for a digital logic design curriculum revision in collaboration with the College of Lake County in Illinois, and a NSF award in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, Drake State Technical College, and Chandler-Gilbert Community College. The award focused on expanding outreach activities to increase the awareness of potential college students about career opportunities in electronics technologies. Dr. Alaraje is a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), a member of the ASEE Electrical and Computer Engineering Division, a member of the ASEE Engineering Technology Division, a senior member of the Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE), and a member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology Department Heads Association (ECETDHA).

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Mark Highum Bay de Noc Community College

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Mark Highum is currently the Division Chair for Technology at Bay College. He is the Lead Instructor for Mechatronics and Robotics Systems and also teaches courses in the Computer Network Systems and Security degree. Mark holds a Master's in Career and Technical Education (Highest Distinction) from Ferris State University, and a Bachelor's in Workforce Education and Development (Summa Cum Laude) from Southern Illinois University.
Mark is a retired Chief Electronics Technician (Submarines) and served and taught as part of the Navy's Nuclear Power Program.
Mark is active with SkillsUSA and has been on the National Education Team for Mechatronics since 2004.

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Prince Mehandiratta Michigan Technological University

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Mr. Mehandiratta is currently pursuing a graduate degree in Mechanical Engineering at Michigan Tech. His professional interests include Industry 4.0, Robotics, Automation and Vegan Food Industry. He can be reached at pkmehand@mtu.edu

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Abstract

Recently, educators have worked to improve STEM education at all levels, but challenges remain. Capitalizing on the appeal of robotics is one strategy proposed to increase STEM interest. The interdisciplinary nature of robots, which involve motors, sensors, and programs, make robotics a useful STEM pedagogical tool. There is also a significant need for industrial certification programs in robotics. Robots are increasingly used across industry sectors to improve production throughputs while maintaining product quality. The benefits of robotics, however, depend on workers with up-to-date knowledge and skills to maintain and use existing robots, enhance future technologies, and educate users. It is critical that education efforts respond to the demand for robotics specialists by offering courses and professional certification in robotics and automation. This NSF sponsored project introduces a new approach for Industrial Robotics in electrical engineering technology (EET) programs at University and Community College. The curriculum and software developed by this collaboration of two- and four-year institutions match industry needs and provide a replicable model for programs around the US. The project also addresses the need for certified robotic training centers (CRTCs) and provides curriculum and training opportunities for students from other institutions, industry representatives, and displaced workers. Resources developed via this project were extensively disseminated through a variety of means, including workshops, conferences, and publications. In this article, authors provide final report on project outcomes, including various curriculum models and industry certification development, final stage of the “RobotRun” robotic simulation software, benefits of professional development opportunities for the faculty members from the other institutions, training workshops for K-12 teachers, and robotic one-day camps for high school students.

Sergeyev, A., & Kinney, M. B., & Kuhl, S. A., & Alaraje, N., & Highum, M., & Mehandiratta, P. (2019, June), University, Community College, and Industry Partnership: Revamping Robotics Education to Meet 21st Century Workforce Needs – NSF-sponsored Project Final Report Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/33487

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