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Using Mathematica With Multivariable Calculus

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

4.581.1 - 4.581.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8032

Download Count

521

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Paper Authors

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Teri J. Murphy

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Russell Goodman

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Michael Hofer

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Jonathon White

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Elena Black

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Bradford Kline

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2265

Using Mathematica with Multivariable Calculus

Teri J. Murphy, Jonathan J. White Department of Mathematics, University of Oklahoma

Bradford J. Kline Department of Mathematical Sciences, United States Air Force Academy

Elena Black, Russell Goodman, and Michael Hofer Department of Mathematics, University of Oklahoma

Abstract

The Department of Mathematics at the University of Oklahoma (OU) is developing technology- based materials for its engineering calculus sequence, both to enhance conceptual understanding and to prepare students for problem-solving with the computational power available. In this paper, we discuss the in-class use of Mathematica animations and sequences of overhead transparencies, and the out-of-class use of problem sets and the World Wide Web, with multivariable calculus. A goal of the ongoing project is to offer interested instructors a variety of materials that will enable them to incorporate technology at a level of integration that they deem appropriate.

Need For Technology

Technology has played an increasingly important role in our society over the past several decades. Perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than in engineering fields throughout industry, government, and academia. It is difficult to imagine any modern engineering work being performed without the aid of a computer! Thus, a necessary part of any undergraduate education in the engineering disciplines is exposure to and competency with technology. For many years, engineering departments at colleges and universities have made it a point to incorporate technology into their curricula, exposing students to the latest in computational, design, and modeling software. It is only fitting that calculus and other engineering mathematics courses, as necessary prerequisites to most studies in engineering, also incorporate the latest technological innovations, both to enhance conceptual understanding and to prepare students for problem-solving with the computational power available.

One of the most pressing challenges mathematics departments face is the appropriate use of technology — especially calculators and computers — in calculus courses. The Department of Mathematics at the University of Oklahoma (OU) is developing technology-based materials for its engineering calculus sequence. Ultimately the goal is to offer calculus instructors the option to blend such technology with relevant mathematics content and instructional strategies in a coherent and easily usable manner.

Murphy, T. J., & Goodman, R., & Hofer, M., & White, J., & Black, E., & Kline, B. (1999, June), Using Mathematica With Multivariable Calculus Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/8032

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