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2 + 2 + 2 Equals An Educational Pathway Without Limitations

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Conference

2002 Annual Conference

Location

Montreal, Canada

Publication Date

June 16, 2002

Start Date

June 16, 2002

End Date

June 19, 2002

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Building Bridges in ET

Page Count

4

Page Numbers

7.7.1 - 7.7.4

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/10213

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

author page

Scott Dunning

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Main Menu Session 3650

2 + 2 + 2 Equals Educational Pathways Without Limitations

Dr. Scott Dunning, P.E.

University of Maine

Abstract

One of the concerns of students entering into an engineering technology program is the possibility of educational limitations due to their choice of major. At the University of Maine, we have developed a pathway that allows for successful transition from an Associates Degree in Electrical and Automation Technology to a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering.

This paper will discuss the details of the current articulation agreements between the University of Maine Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) program, the University of Maine Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) program and the Eastern Maine Technical College Electrical and Automation Technology program. It will also discuss the current process to develop a similar pathway in information technology.

Previous Issues

Traditionally, Maine students had three specific paths to pursue degrees in electrical engineering that weren’t related. The path they chose was dependent upon their high school credentials and often upon their socio-economic background. They could pursue an Associates degree in Electrical and Automation Technology at one of the states’ technical colleges, a Bachelors Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology at the University of Maine or a Bachelors Degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of Maine. If the student chose wisely, they could find the program best suited to their needs. Unfortunately, students are forced to make that decision at a very young age. Traditional students are forced to make their decision at roughly seventeen years of age. With so little life experience, students often find themselves in the wrong program. In the past, this would leave them with years of credits and expenditures that could not be applied to an alternate program. A student who completed a Bachelors Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology would not be able to pursue a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering. Also, a student who completed an Associates Degree in Electrical and Automation Engineering Technology at Eastern Maine Technical College would have no idea which credits might transfer into a Bachelors Degree program at the University of Maine. This confusion created barriers between the programs that adversely affected students.

Main Menu Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Confe rence & Exposition Copyright Ó 2002, American Society for Engineering Education

Dunning, S. (2002, June), 2 + 2 + 2 Equals An Educational Pathway Without Limitations Paper presented at 2002 Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada. https://peer.asee.org/10213

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