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A Case Study To Explore Learning During A Faculty Development Workshop

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Trends in Engineering Education Poster Session

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

11.12.1 - 11.12.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/924

Download Count

39

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Paper Authors

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Donald Elger University of Idaho

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DONALD F. ELGER is a professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Idaho. Dr. Elger teaches “how to learn,” entrepreneurship, design, and fluid mechanics. Dr. Elger has co-authored a nation-ally-recognized text in engineering fluid mechanics, has won the ASEE best paper award at the regional and national level, and has led the Enriched Learning Environment Project at the UI. Present research and practice areas, funded by the NSF, involve theory of learning, transformational leadership in higher educa-tion, and design of effective organizations and learning environments.

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Scott Metlen University of Idaho

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SCOTT METLEN is an assistant professor of Production Operations Management (POM) at the University of Idaho where he teaches Quality Management and POM topics in a faculty team that teaches an integrated business curricu-lum. His research interests include all aspects of process management--design, implementation, control, and im-provement of value-added processes. Scott is particularly interested in high level processes, such as the education and learning. These processes are interesting because they are challenging to manage and integrate.

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Robert Carson University of Idaho

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BOB CARSON is an instructor of Design Analysis in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Idaho. Mr. Car-son teaches teaming, math modeling and project management. He is semi-retired after a career in senior manage-ment in the manufacturing division for an electronics manufacturer and consults on various projects by the Me-chanical Engineering department at UI. Present activities include participation in a faculty focus group on transfor-mational leadership in higher education and facilitating construction of a "green" building for teaching/research.

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Tristan Utschig Lewis-Clark State College

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TRISTAN UTSCHIG is an Associate Professor of Engineering Physics at Lewis-Clark State College in Idaho. He is director of the pre-engineering program and currently teaches freshman and sophomore level engineering and phys-ics courses. Dr. Utschig's research focuses on assessment from the classroom level to the program and institutional level. He has published on teaching diversity, using technology in the classroom, and faculty development related to instructional design, assessment, and peer coaching. Prior to joining the faculty at Lewis-Clark State College, Dr. Utschig completed his PhD in Nuclear Engineering at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. His technical exper-tise involves analysis of thermal systems for fusion reactor designs.

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Dan Cordon University of Idaho

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DANIEL CORDON is a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Idaho. He teaches a course in Internal Combustion Engines that emphasizes mathematical modeling of thermophysical systems. He also teaches a senior laboratory course that introduces principles of experiment design and small-sample statistics. Dan’s doctoral research involves use of catalytic ignitors to support combustion of water/ethanol fuel. Dan also manages the UI Small Engine Research Facility – helping students with the FutureTruck, Formula SAE, and Clean Snowmobile Challenge competitions. He received a UTC Student of the Year award in 2003 for his efforts.

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Marie Racine University of District Columbia

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MARIE RACINE is Professor of Languages and Acting Director of Assessment at the University of District Co-lumbia. In 2005, she served as co-chair of the institutional self-study that was submitted to Middle States for ac-creditation. Marie plays an active role in supporting faculty development and strategic planning, coordinating a va-riety of collaborative projects for continuous quality improvement.

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Steven Beyerlein University of Idaho

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DANIEL CORDON is a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Idaho. He teaches a course in Internal Combustion Engines that emphasizes mathematical modeling of thermophysical systems. He also teaches a senior laboratory course that introduces principles of experiment design and small-sample statistics. Dan’s doctoral research involves use of catalytic ignitors to support combustion of water/ethanol fuel. Dan also manages the UI Small Engine Research Facility – helping students with the FutureTruck, Formula SAE, and Clean Snowmobile Challenge competitions. He received a UTC Student of the Year award in 2003 for his efforts.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Case Study to Explore Learning during a Faculty Development Workshop

Abstract: A central mission in the educational research community is to improve learning. The purpose of this project was to identify key factors that mediate in learning in the context of a fac- ulty development workshop focused on assessment. Data were collected by a six person research-participant team using multiple approaches: direct observations, pre-workshop surveys; semi-structured interviews; a post-workshop prioritization survey; and a workshop e-journal. Analysis and triangulation of data revealed the five most significant factors impacting learning: (a) put the learners in the role of performer and provide assessment that helps the learners im- prove their performance, (b) concept attainment (especially distinguishing between assessment and evaluation), (c) modeling of best practices by the facilitator, (d) ongoing collaboration be- tween participants throughout the workshop, and (e) schema that allowed participants to see commonalities in different types of assessment. Since learning is a complex process, attention should be given to all design elements in order to produce an enriched learning environment.

1. Introduction In education, there is an emerging revolution in learning. This revolution, driven by external re- alities such as globalization, sustainability, changing societal values, and economics, will be em- powered by research-based knowledge of “how people learn.” To characterize learning, we use the concept of a learning environment. A learning environment is the complex of factors, both internal and external to a context, that act on a community of people to influence construction of knowledge, development of skills, and development of identity. Examples of learning environ- ments include: a classroom, a workshop, an academic department, a research team, a family, an organizational unit in a company, and a professional community. An enriched learning environ- ment is an environment that is highly effective in producing growth in people that interact in the environment.

One way to think about learning environments is through the lens of design. From a design viewpoint, there are factors that the instructor or manager can control (independent variables) and corresponding dependent variables that result from the environment. Here, the independent or controllable variables are called “design elements” or “factors.” The present study focused on identifying design elements in the context of a faculty development workshop in the area of as- sessment. The research question was: “For professors who are improving their knowledge of assessment and their ability to effectively assess others, what factors (design elements) or com- binations of factors mediate in learning, attitudinal changes, and performance improvements?” Important reasons to research faculty development include (a) effective faculty development produces “great coaches” who bring out the best in others, and (b) impacting a small community of professors impacts many students.

In summary, the objectives of the study were to identity factors that can be designed into a learn- ing environment in order to elevate learning to high levels.

Elger, D., & Metlen, S., & Carson, R., & Utschig, T., & Cordon, D., & Racine, M., & Beyerlein, S. (2006, June), A Case Study To Explore Learning During A Faculty Development Workshop Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/924

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015