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A Collaborative Case Study For Teaching “Achieving Lean System Benefits In Manufacturing And Supply Chains” To Engineering Management Students

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

EMD Program Design

Tagged Division

Engineering Management

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

12.14.1 - 12.14.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1870

Download Count

169

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Paper Authors

biography

Ertunga Ozelkan University of North Carolina-Charlotte

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Ertunga C. Ozelkan, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Management and the Associate Director of the Center for Lean Logistics and Engineered Systems at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Before joining academia, Dr. Ozelkan worked for i2 Technologies, a leading supply chain software vendor in the capacity of a Customer Service and Global Curriculum Manager and a Consultant. He also worked as a project manager and a consultant for Tefen Consulting in the area of productivity improvement for Hitech firms. Dr. Ozelkan holds a Ph.D. degree in Systems and Industrial Engineering from the University of Arizona. His teaching and research is on supply chain management, production control, lean systems, decision analysis and systems optimization. Dr. Ozelkan is the recipient of IIE’s 2006 Lean Division Excellence in Teaching Award.

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biography

S. Gary Teng University of North Carolina-Charlotte

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S. Gary Teng is Professor and Director of Engineering Management Program and Center for Lean Logistics and Engineered Systems at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He holds B.E., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Industrial Engineering. Dr. Teng holds a P.E. license in the State of Wisconsin and is an ASQ-certified Quality Engineer and Reliability Engineer. His research interests are in engineering system design, analysis and management, supply chain management, Lean systems, and quality and reliability management.

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Thomas Johnson Besam Entrance Solutions

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Thomas E. Johnson III, President of Johnson Lean Consultancy, 28 years of manufacturing experience in all facets of production and operations. Consultant to operations for many Fortune 100 companies in aerospace, automotive, precision materials, and supply chain operations. Professional instructor and mentor for Lean transformations and new operation start-ups.

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biography

Tom Benson Pass and Seymour-Legrand

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Tom Benson is a Quality and Manufacturing Management professional with over 30 years experience working with Fortune 500 companies as well as start up companies. These companies include Xerox, Black and Decker and Hayes Microcomputer Products. He received his BS in Industrial Technology from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois and MBA from Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois. He is a Senior Member of the American Society for Quality and is a CQE and CQA.

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Dean Nestvogel Pass and Seymour-Legrand

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Dean Nestvogel is a Project/Quality Manager with over 15 years of manufacturing experience. This includes a start up operation with Westinghouse and his current work at Pass & Seymour/legrand. He has spent the past 4 years successfully championing Lean Transformation at his facility in Concord, NC. He received his BS in Industrial Engineering from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Collaborative Case Study for Teaching “Achieving Lean System Benefits in Manufacturing and Supply Chains” to Engineering Management Students

Abstract

With the ongoing global pressure of cost cutting and quality focus, many companies have been implementing “lean manufacturing” concepts to survive in this competitive marketplace. “Lean” concepts have found their place in manufacturing and service industries; an important key to eliminating waste and delivering value to the customers. Thus, it is imperative that engineering management graduates are equipped with the lean principles and be ready to take ownership of lean initiatives as they transition to the industry.

This paper presents a lean supply chain case study for a bicycle manufacturing company; created in an effort to expose students to a real life lean implementation experience. The project was initiated and completed with collaborations from the academia and the industry. The case study introduces four scenarios related to Forecasting, Inventory Control, Product Design issues and Manufacturing constraints. The scenarios are based on actual global business challenges a Project Facilitator may encounter with a traditional business enterprise before the introduction to Lean Supply Chain Management and Lean Manufacturing. The paper summarizes the business challenges presented by the case study and discusses how the lean business scenarios were analyzed to develop effective solutions that deliver significant business benefits. The lean supply chain case study not only demonstrates that being “lean” requires going beyond the four walls of a manufacturing company, but also presents a good working model for university and industry integration in an effort to jointly develop qualified lean professionals.

1. Introduction

The word ‘lean production’ was first used by Krafcik8 and then it was popularized with the works of Womack et al.13 and Womack and Jones14. Many industry professionals and researchers agree that “Lean is doing more with less”. Today, lean production strategies are not optional for companies anymore but rather a must-do to survive in the global economy. Initially recognized by Toyota (thus also referred as the Toyota Production System), “lean production” has become more and more popular in the US, starting with the automotive industry13 but propagating into every industry sector, including services.

In order to have a smooth transition to the industry and confront the industry challenges, graduates from engineering and business schools need to be well trained in “lean” concepts. More and more programs are recognizing this need, and including courses on “lean” into their curriculum1,4,5,6,7,10,11,12.

Production Principles and Strategies such as “lean” can be taught using some of the traditional approaches such as industry projects, case studies, computer simulations, class projects, and company visits to name a few. Ormrod9 describes a discovery learning approach which can be helpful as well, where he defines discovery learning as "an

1

Ozelkan, E., & Teng, S. G., & Johnson, T., & Benson, T., & Nestvogel, D. (2007, June), A Collaborative Case Study For Teaching “Achieving Lean System Benefits In Manufacturing And Supply Chains” To Engineering Management Students Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1870

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015