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A Combined Curriculum in Aerospace and Ocean Engineering: 38 Years Later

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Aerospace Curriculum and Collaborations

Tagged Division

Aerospace

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

22.22.1 - 22.22.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/17304

Download Count

63

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Paper Authors

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Leigh S McCue Virginia Tech

biography

Joseph A. Schetz Virginia Tech

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Dr. Joseph A. Schetz is currently the Holder of the Fred D. Durham Chair in Aerospace and Ocean Engineering at Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, Virginia. Dr. Schetz was born and raised in New Jersey and then attended Webb Institute of Naval Architecture in New York receiving a B.S. in 1958. The launch of Sputnik in 1957 caused him to change directions and enter the aerospace field. He went on to receive his M.S.E. (1960), M.A. (1961) and Ph.D. (1962) in Mechanical Engineering from Princeton University.
He started his professional career at General Applied Science Lab. in New York in 1961, working under the well-known Dr. Antonio Ferri. At GASL, Dr. Schetz performed innovative analyses and experiments on the then new concept of supersonic combustion ramjets. In 1964, Dr. Schetz joined the faculty of the University of Maryland as an Associate Professor. In the same year, he began work as a Consultant to the Applied Physics Lab. of Johns Hopkins Univ. That relationship continued on a regular basis for 32 years. While at the Univ. of Maryland and APL/JHU, he made many important contributions to high-speed aerodynamics and combustion. He came to Virginia Tech in 1969 as Head of the Aerospace Engineering Dept., a position he held until 1993. That period saw a rapid expansion of the department and a new emphasis on research and graduate study.
His research interests cover all aspects of aircraft aerodynamics and design, an experimental and theoretical fluid dynamics, with a particular emphasis on high-speed flows and propulsion. Dr. Schetz is the author of three books, five chapters in other books and more than 300 refereed papers and Editor of a three-volume handbook on fluid dynamics and fluids machinery. He has received several major research and literature awards from national professional societies, Virginia Tech and other universities, and he is a Life Fellow of both AIAA (1985) and ASME (1980).
One of his books is a highly-regarded textbook, and he has won awards for classroom teaching. A current total of 65 Ph.D. students and an even larger number of M.S. students have completed their degrees under his supervision. These former students now hold a wide variety of important positions in industry, government and academia both in the US and overseas. He is a frequent and active member of the Ph.D. committees of graduate students not only in aerospace, but also civil and mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech and foreign universities.

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Abstract

A combined curriculum in aerospace and ocean engineering—38 years later Leigh McCue & Joseph Schetz Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Virginia TechAt the 1973 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference Profs. Schetz,Marchman, and Inger presented the case for a combined curriculum in aerospace and oceanengineering. Their paper summarized the justification for this combination, programimplementation, and preliminary feedback from students and employers. The purpose of thispaper is to reflect upon the program evolution that has occurred in the 38 years since the initialcreation of this merged department. The paper will present the current state of teaching andresearch in the combined Aerospace and Ocean Engineering department and provide bothstudent and employer feedback on the dual program offerings.

McCue, L. S., & Schetz, J. A. (2011, June), A Combined Curriculum in Aerospace and Ocean Engineering: 38 Years Later Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/17304

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