Asee peer logo

A Compact Device for Inductive Instruction in General Physics

Download Paper |

Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering Physics & Physics Division Technical Session 4

Tagged Division

Engineering Physics & Physics

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

26.21.1 - 26.21.15

DOI

10.18260/p.23362

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23362

Download Count

38

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Taylor Sharpe Portland State University

visit author page

Taylor Sharpe is a mechanical engineering student at Portland State University. He is involved in initiatives involving science education, rural public health and monitoring, and renewable energy / energy efficiency technologies.

He is the co-founder and pedagogy/communications lead for Physics in Motion, a student team working to integrate physical teaching devices into the existing Physics with Calculus Workshop program run by the Portland State Physics Department.

visit author page

biography

Geng Qin Portland State University

visit author page

Geng Qin is a mechanical engineering student at Portland State University. He is committed to science education, innovative design, and stage performance.

He is the co-founder and design lead for Physics in Motion. Physics in Motion is working to integrate physical teaching devices into the existing Physics with Calculus Workshop program run by the Portland State Physics Department.

visit author page

biography

Gerald W. Recktenwald Portland State University

visit author page

Gerald Recktenwald is an Associate Professor and the Chair of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department at Portland State University. His current research interests are in improving engineering education, and in the numerical simulation and measurement of heat transfer in electronic equipment, energy efficient buildings, and other industrial applications.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

A  Compact  Device  for  Hands-­‐on  Instruction  in  General  Physics  Research  from  the  past  three  decades  has  found  that  an  interactive  engagement  approach  to  teaching  the  sciences  which  involves  physical  interaction  with  systems  helps  students  build  effective  mental  models.    Our  team  of  engineering  students  has  developed  a  novel  tabletop  teaching  device  designed  to  help  incoming  students  solidify  and  retain  knowledge  of  first-­‐term  General  Physics  in  an  iterative  manner.    The  design  is  informed  by  a  pedagogical  model  based  on  giving  students  open-­‐ended  problems  that  require  a  network  of  conceptual  knowledge.    This  hybrid  hands-­‐on  and  inductive  model  could  increase  student  motivation  to  more  deeply  understand  concepts  that  have  often  been  difficult  to  learn.    Almost  every  concept  in  first-­‐term  General  Physics  has  been  incorporated  into  the  design  of  the  device,  allowing  for  high  curriculum  mobility  in  an  inexpensive  and  compact  apparatus.  A  prototype  device  has  been  partially  integrated  into  X  University’s  existing  Physics  with  Calculus  Workshop  curriculum,  being  used  in  three  of  nine  weekly  sessions.  At  the  end  of  the  term,  anonymous  questionnaires  will  be  used  to  gauge  student  interest  in  the  device  as  a  learning  and  motivation  tool  in  the  workshop  environment,  informing  future  research  and  development  of  the  device.  The  data  from  the  student  surveys  will  also  be  used  to  create  a  more  formal  assessment  of  student  knowledge  gains.     A  second  prototype  is  under  development,  and  will  be  more  fully  integrated  into  the  workshop  model  if  responses  suggest  that  learning  could  be  improved.    A  novel  aspect  of  this  work  is  that  the  hands-­‐on  device  was  conceived,  developed,  fabricated  and  tested  entirely  by  undergraduate  engineering  students.  Another  distinctive  feature  is  that  an  Arduino  microcontroller  provides  the  data  collection  and  control  of  the  apparatus,  allowing  for  great  curriculum  mobility.  

Sharpe, T., & Qin, G., & Recktenwald, G. W. (2015, June), A Compact Device for Inductive Instruction in General Physics Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.23362

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015