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A Cooling, Heating, And Power For Buildings (Chp B) Instructional Module

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Advancing Thermal Science Education

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

8.32.1 - 8.32.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/11636

Download Count

39

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Paper Authors

author page

B.K. Hodge

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1166

A Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHP-B) Instructional Module

B. K. Hodge, J. D. Hardy Mississippi State University

Abstract Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHP-B) is an important emphasis area for the U. S. Department of Energy (USDOE). By coupling local electricity generation (fuel cells, gas turbines, internal combustion engines) with thermally-activated components (absorption chillers, desiccants, heat recovery steam generators) system thermal efficiencies in excess of 80 percent are possible. This paper describes an instructional module that succinctly discusses CHP components. The module, which is designed for use in senior-level engineering courses, contains first-order descriptions of prime movers as well as thermally-regenerated components. The module contains references, web-site addresses, manufacturers’ information and web sites, pictures, a case study, example problems, and system schematics for CHP-B systems. The intent is that the CHP module is instructor ready and can be used to readily introduce CHP concepts in a variety of engineering courses. This instructional module provides engineering educators a quick, complete, but first order, way to incorporate CHP into engineering courses. Information for obtaining the module is provided.

Background

Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHP-B) is an important twenty-first century emphasis area for the U. S. Department of Energy (USDOE). By coupling local electricity generation (gas turbines, fuel cells, internal combustion engines,…) with thermally-activated building systems (absorption chillers, desiccant dehumidifiers, heat recovery steam generators,…) system thermal efficiencies in excess of 80 percent are possible. The high thermal efficiencies of CHP-B systems contrast with the near-30 percent thermal efficiencies of stand- alone, simple-cycle, fossil-fuel power plants. The USDOE perspective on CHP-B is available on the web site (1) www.chpb.net. The USDOE is interested in CHP-B because the wide-spread adoption and use of CHP systems would markedly reduce fossil fuel consumption (promoting less dependence on foreign oil), would reduce green house gas emissions, and could result in better indoor environmental quality (IEQ) for residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Although none of the CHP-B component technologies are new and although cogeneration and combined cycle applications are well established, the goal of the CHP-B program is that CHP-B systems should become pervasive in institutional, commercial, and industrial facilities. A Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Hodge, B. (2003, June), A Cooling, Heating, And Power For Buildings (Chp B) Instructional Module Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/11636

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