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A First Year Engineering Information Literacy Workshop: Redesigned for Remote Delivery

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

TS3: Working with Students

Tagged Division

Engineering Libraries

Page Count

31

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36579

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36579

Download Count

33

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Paper Authors

biography

Jodi A. Bolognese Northeastern University

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Jodi Bolognese is the Engineering Librarian at Northeastern University, where she serves as liaison to the College of Engineering and department of Physics. Previously, she worked in product management for learning technologies at Pearson Education, and provided research and information architecture support for Strada Institute for the Future of Work. Jodi holds a BA in English and American Studies from Fairfield University and a MS in Library and Information Science from Simmons University.

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Richard Whalen Northeastern University

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Dr. Richard Whalen is a Teaching Professor at Northeastern University in Boston, MA and is Director of First-year Engineering. The mission of the First-year Engineering team is to provide a reliable, wide-ranging, and constructive educational experience that endorses the student-centered and professionally-oriented mission of the University. He also teaches specialty courses in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Northeastern and has published and presented papers on approaches and techniques in engineering education. He has won multiple Outstanding Teaching Awards at Northeastern and numerous Best Paper and Best Presentation Awards with fellow First-year faculty coauthors at ASEE.

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Evie Dee Cordell Northeastern University

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Evie Cordell is the First Year Experience and Undergraduate Engagement Librarian at Northeastern University. She is the liaison to the Writing Program, General Studies Program, Explore Program, ContiNUe Program, NUi.n. and several other First Year Programs at Northeastern University. She also serves on the First Pages (Northeastern University's common reads program) committee and is a member of the FUNL (First Generation, Undocumented, Low-Income) Network at Northeastern.

Evie holds a Bachelors degree in Religious Studies from the University of Virginia and a Masters of Science in Library & Information Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Alissa P. Link Cilfone Northeastern University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-1736-329X

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Alissa Link Cilfone is the Head of STEM and Entrepreneurship at Northeastern University serving as liaison to the departments of bioengineering, biology, and biochemistry in addition to leading an interdisciplinary systematic reviews team.

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Brooke D. Williams Northeastern University

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Brooke Williams is a Research and Instruction Librarian at Northeastern University serving as liaison to the Khoury College of Computer Science, the departments of English literature, communication studies and theatre, the School of Journalism and the Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program. Before joining the team at Northeastern, she worked as the Resident Librarian for Information Literacy Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Brooke has bachelor's degrees in English literature and American studies from Skidmore College and a Master of Arts in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Abstract

Background This complete evidence-based practice paper presents an update of analysis and lessons learned in a required first-year engineering curriculum at a medium sized private urban university. Over the last two years, Research & Instruction librarians at U University partnered with the First Year Engineering program to develop and refine an interactive in-person workshop series designed to introduce new engineering students to key research resources at the start of their degree programs. The program has grown rapidly, serving more than 500 first year engineering students in fall 2019 with positive outcomes including high perceived value by students, high participation rates, and faculty noting improvement in the quality of students’ research. When the COVID-19 pandemic forced U University to adopt a hybrid learning model, the team redesigned the workshop for remote delivery with the goal of maintaining high participation rates and positive student outcomes.

Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this paper is to (1) Describe how we redesigned the workshop, including the process and new workshop format which included an asynchronous module delivered via Canvas, followed by a live Zoom class meeting. (2) Compare the outcomes of the online workshops delivered in fall 2020 with the outcomes of the previous in-person workshops to assess impact of the new delivery mode (3) Share lessons learned and consider opportunities to improve remote design and delivery of such workshops in the future.

Design/Scope/Method In order to compare outcomes, data collection will mirror that of the 2019 study, including attendance, student performance on in-class quizzes, and end of semester surveys for both students and faculty to evaluate perceived value, impact on students’ research, and suggestions for improvement. Additionally for fall 2020, we will measure students’ perceived value of the redesigned workshop’s asynchronous and synchronous elements with a post-session survey, as well as metrics for completion of the asynchronous module in Canvas. We’ll also consider this in context of other efforts to flip or redesign similar programs to be delivered remotely.

Results Early findings show that students see high value in both the asynchronous and synchronous components of the redesigned workshop. Of the 103 students we’ve taught so far this semester, 63 completed the post-session survey (61%). The majority of respondents rated both components highly, with students finding slightly more overall value in the synchronous Zoom session (88.9% extremely or very useful) than the asynchronous Canvas module (77.8%). This roughly mirrors the 2019 result of 82.4% of students rating the overall workshop as extremely or very useful. However, the librarians have observed students missing slightly more questions in the interactive quiz during the synchronous session, potentially due to the ability to deliver less individualized, just-in-time support in the online class environment.

Conclusions Early findings indicate that we are delivering the workshop remotely with reasonable success, but that there may be more we can do to engage students and personalize instruction in the online environment, and/or to use remote delivery to our advantage in scaling up the program. Significant data collection and analysis will take place after the majority of the workshops are delivered and will no doubt impact our conclusions and future plans.

Bolognese, J. A., & Whalen, R., & Cordell, E. D., & Link Cilfone, A. P., & Williams, B. D. (2021, July), A First Year Engineering Information Literacy Workshop: Redesigned for Remote Delivery Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36579

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015