Asee peer logo

A Framework For Developing Courses On Engineering And Technology For Non Engineers

Download Paper |

Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Service Courses for Non-Engineers

Tagged Division

Technological Literacy Constituent Committee

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

13.40.1 - 13.40.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3508

Download Count

12

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

John Krupczak Hope College

visit author page

Professor of Engineering

visit author page

biography

Timothy Simpson Pennsylvania State University

visit author page

Professor of Mechanical Engineering

visit author page

biography

Vince Bertsch Santa Rosa Junior College

visit author page

Professor of Engineering and Physics

visit author page

biography

Kate Disney Mission College

visit author page

Engineering Instructor

visit author page

biography

Elsa Garmire Dartmouth College

visit author page

Sydney E. Junkins 1887 Professor of Engineering

visit author page

biography

Barbara Oakley Oakland University

visit author page

Associate Professor of Engineering

visit author page

biography

Mary Rose Ball State University

visit author page

Assistant Professor, Department of Technology

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Framework for Developing Courses on Engineering and Technology for Non-Engineers

Abstract

All Americans need to better understand the wide variety of technology used everyday. The need for technological literacy has never been greater at both an individual and national level. Creating a population with a more empowered relationship with technology will require a significant and widespread initiative in undergraduate education. Courses and materials that are easily adoptable in diverse and varied institutional environments will facilitate this effort. In two reports: Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More about Technology (2002), and Tech Tally: Approaches to Assessing Technological Literacy (2006), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), has outlined the characteristics of a technologically literate citizen. The International Technology Education Association (ITEA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) have also developed standards defining technological literacy. Recognizing the need for standardized and readily adoptable undergraduate courses on this topic, the NSF supported a working group lead by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Technological Literacy Constituent Committee. This group met on March 26-27, 2007 and adopted four models to serve as standardized courses on technology. In this work, a framework for specific course outlines consistent with the content areas established in Tech Tally of: technology and society, design, products and systems, and technology core concepts and the ITEA technology topic areas was created. To balance the need to accommodate the diverse requirements of curriculum committees on varied campuses, the framework offers flexibility to faculty in configuring courses within each proposed model while still accomplishing the intent of the standards. This framework is intended to form the organizational infrastructure for creating a repository of course materials and an online community for course developers and instructors.

Overview

Technology affects nearly every aspect of our lives, and informed citizens need an understanding of what technology is, how it works, how it is created, how it shapes society, and how society influences technological development. Technological choices influence our health and economic well-being, the types of jobs and recreation available, even our means of self-expression. How well American citizens are prepared to make those choices depends in large part on their level of technological literacy. At a recent NSF Workshop at the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) participants sought to create a set of standard models for teaching technological literacy courses [1,2]. As part of that workshop, a framework for evaluating courses on technological literacy and providing a useful context for discussing standard models for technological literacy courses was developed. Such a framework is not only critical for developing effective technological literacy courses but is also a pre-requisite for developing standard course models.

Krupczak, J., & Simpson, T., & Bertsch, V., & Disney, K., & Garmire, E., & Oakley, B., & Rose, M. (2008, June), A Framework For Developing Courses On Engineering And Technology For Non Engineers Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3508

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015