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A "Global" Curriculum To Support Civil Engineering In Developing Nations

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Challenges of CE Education in a Global World

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

13.4.1 - 13.4.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4281

Download Count

18

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Paper Authors

biography

Fred Meyer United States Military Academy

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Colonel Fred Meyer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at the United States Military Academy and serves as the Civil Engineering Division Director. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from USMA in 1984, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Civil Engineering from Georgia Tech in 1993, and 2002, respectively. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Virginia. Colonel Meyer has been a member of the USMA faculty for over five years and teaches courses in basic mechanics, structural steel design, reinforced concrete design, and structural system design. He has served as a senior mentor and seminar presenter in the ExCEEd (Excellence in Civil Engineering Education) Teaching Workshop from 2000 through 2007.

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C. Conley

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Chris Conley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at the U.S. Military Academy. He earned a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Massachusetts (1978), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Civil Engineering from Cornell University (1980, 1983). He has served as a Member of Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories, a Senior Research Associate at Cornell University, and an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. In his 13 years on the USMA faculty he has taught a variety of courses in the civil and mechanical engineering programs, and has collaborated on research with Army laboratory personnel.

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Joseph Hanus United States Military Academy

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Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Hanus is the Civil Engineering Departmen⁴s Structures Group Director at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. He received his BS from the University of Wisconsin - Platteville; MS from the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities; and PhD from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. He is an active member of ASEE and is a registered Professional Engineer in Wisconsin. His research interests include fiber reinforced polymer materials, accelerated bridge construction, and engineering education.

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James Ledlie Klosky

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Led Klosky is an Associate Professor and Director of the Mechanics Group in the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at the United States Military Academy at West Point. Dr. Klosky received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1987 and 1988, respectively. He earned a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1997, He is a registered Professional Engineer in Maryland.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A “Global” Curriculum to Support Civil Engineering in Developing Nations

Abstract

The Civil Engineering (CE) program at the United States Military Academy (USMA) is a traditional program emphasizing the foundations of civil engineering with a focus on structural engineering. Typically, about 65 percent of the cadets majoring in CE select the United States Army Corps of Engineers as their branch of service following graduation. To ensure that programs maintain relevance, ABET requires that all programs identify their constituencies and demonstrate that the program meets the constituents’ needs. The United States Army, the Corps of Engineers and program graduates are the three principal constituents of the USMA CE program.

Over the last six years, the Army has been involved in ongoing conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan. As directed in Department of Defense Directive 3000.05,1 the Army and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has become intensely involved with the development, management, and security of infrastructure as a means to shape success and bring future stability to both countries. Feedback from the field, personal experiences, and common sense have shown that current USMA CE program course requirements may not be optimal for preparing graduates to meet the needs of constituents. The ASCE Body of Knowledge (BOK) has suggested also new curricular requirements which must be considered as part of the program review process. The Vision for Civil Engineering in 2025,2 an ASCE publication, articulates an “aspirational global vision” for the civil engineering profession and includes significant discussion about the need to focus on infrastructure and for civil engineers to find their role in a “radically transformed world.”

In response to these developments, a major curriculum review is underway to ensure the USMA CE program content will prepare graduates to be relevant as Army officers, meet the anticipated requirements of the BOK, and be prepared to function in a radically transformed world. This paper discusses collection and analysis of survey data from constituents, evaluation of the data, and initial development of a revised CE curriculum. The paper also provides a framework for further analysis and development efforts focused on developing a curriculum that will enable its graduates to be relevant, flexible, and ready to face future civil engineering challenges.

Background

The United States Army has become increasingly involved with the development, management, and security of infrastructure in developing nations, especially in Afghanistan and Iraq. As the nation’s infrastructure manager, USACE is also extensively involved with activities related to infrastructure within the United States (US). Graduates of the USMA CE program who select the Army Corps of Engineers as their branch of service often find themselves involved in activities related to infrastructure during their first and subsequent tours of duty both overseas and in the US. Communications with Army officers serving in the US and deployed in the field and an evaluation of the missions typically faced by engineer units has shown that certain vital

Meyer, F., & Conley, C., & Hanus, J., & Klosky, J. L. (2008, June), A "Global" Curriculum To Support Civil Engineering In Developing Nations Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4281

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