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A Modular Ammonia Stripping Tower Design Project For An Environmental Process Dynamics Course

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Conference

2000 Annual Conference

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Publication Date

June 18, 2000

Start Date

June 18, 2000

End Date

June 21, 2000

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

5.37.1 - 5.37.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8574

Download Count

893

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Paper Authors

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Michael Keinath

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Jr., Walter J. Weber

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Hildegarde Selig

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2451

A Modular Ammonia Stripping Tower Design Project for an Environmental Process Dynamics Course Michael Keinath, Hildegarde Selig and Walter J. Weber, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Abstract

As a requirement of a senior-level environmental process dynamics course, we developed a modular ammonia stripping tower design project. This course introduces fundamental principles of process dynamics in environmental systems, focusing on their modeling and design applications. The modular design project is intended to complement the “common sense approach" instructional philosophy of the class by adding complexity to the overall ammonia stripping tower design through successive modules. Each module corresponded to a topical section of the course with each successive module building on the work of the prior. This step- wise engineering application was designed in such fashion that by the end of the course the students completed a rigorous design of an ammonia stripping tower. To elicit a cooperative learning environment, all but the first of the modules were completed in self-selected groups of three to four students. The effectiveness of this instructional approach was assessed through student surveys before and after the project and analysis of student performance throughout the course. The initial survey revealed that students had a relatively high interest in taking the course despite thinking that it would be more difficult and have a heavier workload than the average UM engineering course. After completion of the project, students found the design modules to be productive and generally enjoyed doing them. The highest average rating (4.0/5.0) was attributed to enjoying working in a group. Overall, the modular design project was an effective way to promote the design process, elucidate relationships between fundamental processes and practical applications, balance students’ workload throughout the semester and foster a cooperative learning environment.

1 Introduction

“Dynamics of Environmental Systems” is a senior-level course required for students focusing in environmental engineering and an elective for all other civil engineers. This course introduces the fundamental principles of process dynamics in environmental systems, focusing on their modeling and design applications. The typical enrollment is approximately 30 students with 25% as first-year graduate students. The course employed a “common sense approach” in which

Keinath, M., & Weber, J. W. J., & Selig, H. (2000, June), A Modular Ammonia Stripping Tower Design Project For An Environmental Process Dynamics Course Paper presented at 2000 Annual Conference, St. Louis, Missouri. https://peer.asee.org/8574

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