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A National Model For Engineering Mathematics Education

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

12.75.1 - 12.75.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2104

Download Count

52

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Paper Authors

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Nathan Klingbeil Wright State University

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Nathan W. Klingbeil is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Robert J. Kegerreis Distinguished Professor of Teaching at Wright State University. He is the lead PI for WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He is the recipient of numerous awards for his work in engineering education, including the CASE Ohio Professor of the Year Award (2005) and the ASEE North Central Section Outstanding Teacher Award (2004).

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Kuldip Rattan Wright State University

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Kuldip S. Rattan is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Wright State University. He is a Co-PI on WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He conducts research in the area of electrical control systems, and is active in engineering education reform. He has been the recipient of the CECS Excellence in Teaching Award at Wright State University in both 1985 and 1992, and of the CECS Excellence in Service Award in 1991, 1996 and 2003.

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Michael Raymer Wright State University

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Michael L. Raymer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at Wright State University. He is a Co-PI on WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education, and has also led an NSF supported research project to develop the nation's first undergraduate curriculum in bioinformatics.

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David Reynolds Wright State University

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David B. Reynolds is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical, Industrial and Human Factors Engineering at Wright State University. He is a Co-PI on WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education, and has also conducted NSF supported research to develop human factors engineering undergraduate design projects for persons with disabilities.

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Richard Mercer Wright State University

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Richard E. Mercer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Wright State University. He is a Co-PI on WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He is active in curriculum reform, and has led an NSF supported effort to integrate Mathematica laboratory sessions into the freshman calculus sequence at Wright State University.

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Anant Kukreti University of Cincinnati

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Anant R. Kukreti is Associate Dean for Engineering Education Research and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Cincinnati (UC). He is the lead investigator for the UC adoption of WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He teaches structural engineering, with research in experimental and finite element analysis of structures. He has received two Professorships, and won four University and two ASEE Teaching Awards.

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Brian Randolph University of Toledo

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Brian W. Randolph is the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies and Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Toledo. He is the lead investigator for the UT adoption of WSU's National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education. He has received numerous awards for his teaching and professional activities, including the ASEE North Central Dow Outstanding Young Faculty Award, repeated department and college teaching awards and was named Toledo Engineer of the Year in 2005.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A National Model for Engineering Mathematics Education

Abstract

The traditional approach to engineering mathematics education begins with one year of freshman calculus as a prerequisite to subsequent core engineering courses. However, the inability of incoming students to successfully advance through the traditional freshman calculus sequence is a primary cause of attrition in engineering programs across the country. As a result, this paper describes an NSF funded initiative at Wright State University to redefine the way in which engineering mathematics is taught, with the goal of increasing student retention, motivation and success in engineering.

This paper provides an overview of the WSU model for engineering mathematics education, followed by an assessment of student performance, perception and retention through its initial implementation1-4. It also summarizes the scope of a recent NSF CCLI Phase 2 Expansion award, which involves a multiyear assessment at WSU, pilot adoption and assessment at two collaborating institutions, and a widespread dissemination of results.

Introduction

Traditionally, only about 42% of incoming freshmen who wish to pursue an engineering or computer science degree at Wright State University (WSU) ever complete the required freshman calculus sequence. The remaining 58% either switch majors or leave the University. These numbers are not unique to WSU; indeed, the inability of incoming students to successfully advance through the traditional freshman calculus sequence is a primary cause of attrition in engineering programs across the country.

Clearly, there are a variety of factors influencing student retention and success in engineering, the most notable being a lack of preparation in high school. Moreover, engineering retention is of particular concern among members of traditionally underrepresented groups, as well as among transfer students and nontraditional students returning to school from the workplace5. This has led engineering educators to introduce early intervention programs, aimed at increasing retention among incoming students6,7. The WrightSTEPP and Academic Advantage programs here at WSU are two such programs, which begin intervention with local high school students even before they begin their freshman years. In addition to early intervention programs, there has been a strong emphasis in recent years on increasing the level of engineering application early in the curriculum, with the goal of increasing student motivation to study engineering. This has led to the development of problem-based freshman engineering courses8-13, including the EGR 190 Fundamentals of Engineering course here at WSU. Such courses are typically designed to give students a broad, application-based introduction to the various engineering disciplines, so that they can begin to appreciate why they must endure the rigor of their subsequent engineering curricula.

Klingbeil, N., & Rattan, K., & Raymer, M., & Reynolds, D., & Mercer, R., & Kukreti, A., & Randolph, B. (2007, June), A National Model For Engineering Mathematics Education Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2104

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