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A Review of the Teaching Modalities Chosen by Faculty During the Global Pandemic

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Faculty Development 2: COVID-19 Impact on Faculty

Tagged Division

Faculty Development Division

Page Count

12

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36607

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36607

Download Count

21

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Paper Authors

biography

Dani Fadda P.E. University of Texas at Dallas

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Dr. Fadda is Associate Professor of Practice in Mechanical Engineering. His background includes two decades of engineering practice in the energy industry where he has held numerous positions. Dr. Fadda has worked in product research and developed patented products for chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear applications. He is an ASME Fellow and a Professional Engineer.

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biography

Oziel Rios University of Texas at Dallas

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Dr. Oziel Rios earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 2008 where his research focused on design of robotic systems with an emphasis on kinematic and dynamic modeling for analysis and control. Dr. Rios teaches the first-year and CAD courses in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Texas at Dallas. Dr. Rios has also taught kinematics and dynamics of machines and graduate-level CAD courses. Dr. Rios’ research and teaching interests include: robotics, design, kinematics and dynamics of machines and engineering education.

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biography

Roopa Vinay University of Texas at Dallas

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Roopa Vinay works an eLearning Manager at the University of Texas at Dallas. She oversees faculty training and support in educational technology applications. She developed an online certification program to help faculty transition from classroom to online teaching. During the 2020 pandemic she designed and coordinated a University-wide training effort to help faculty teach remotely. She has worked with subject matter experts across disciplines to develop academic courses, certification programs, and open-source learning materials. Her background is in instructional design, LMS administration, multimedia production, and student engagement systems.

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Abstract

Universities, worldwide, are managing their course offerings during the coronavirus pandemic in different ways and numerous factors are considered when selecting an appropriate teaching modality. In this paper, a research question is posed as follows: how do faculty members prefer to teach during the pandemic and what are the implications? Data is provided from the engineering and computer science faculty members at The University of Texas at Dallas, where faculty are individually offered a choice among five different teaching modalities. The results are used to quantify our faculty’s selection and explain reasons for selecting a particular teaching modality. The required preparation, and the support offered by the university to the faculty during the pandemic are also addressed. Half the faculty, who taught virtual classes, consider the student’s performance on assessments comparable to the performance of students during previous semesters when the class was given in-person. A quarter considers the student’s performance better and a quarter considers it worse. Beyond the pandemic, the majority of the engineering and computer science faculty prefer flexibility between the classroom and remote teaching. Otherwise, they prefer teaching in the office over working from home.

Fadda, D., & Rios, O., & Vinay, R. (2021, July), A Review of the Teaching Modalities Chosen by Faculty During the Global Pandemic Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36607

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