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A Rubric To Evaluate Standards Based Lesson Plans And Students' Achievement Of The Standards

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Collection

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Assessment of K-12 Engineering Programs and Issues

Tagged Division

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

13.98.1 - 13.98.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3703

Download Count

738

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Paper Authors

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John Carpinelli New Jersey Institute of Technology

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JOHN D. CARPINELLI is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of the Center for Pre-College Programs at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He previously served as coordinator of activities at NJIT for the Gateway Engineering Education Coalition and as a member of the Coalition's Governing Board. He currently chair's NJIT's Excellence in Teaching Awards Committee and is past chair of the University Master Teacher Committee.

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Howard Kimmel New Jersey Institute of Technology

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HOWARD KIMMEL is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Executive Director of the Center for Pre-College Programs at New Jersey Institute of Technology. He has spent the past thirty years designing and implementing professional development programs and curricula for K-12 teachers in science and technology. At the college level, he collaborates on projects exploring teaching methodologies and assessment strategies in first-year college courses in the sciences, engineering, and computer science.

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Linda Hirsch New Jersey Institute of Technology

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LINDA S. HIRSCH is the Program Evaluator in the Center for Pre-College programs. She has a doctoral degree in educational psychology with a specialty in psychometrics and a Masters degree in statistics. She has been involved in all aspects of educational and psychological research for 15 years. Dr. Hirsch has extensive experience conducting longitudinal research studies and is proficient in database management, experimental design, instrument development, psychometrics and statistical programming.

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Levelle Burr-Alexander New Jersey Institute of Technology

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LEVELLE BURR-ALEXANDER is the Project Manager for Instruction in the Center for Pre-College Programs and manages the Education and Training Institute for professional development of educators in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). She has spent the past twenty years designing and implementing STEM programs for 6-12 teachers, students and their parents.

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Ronald Rockland New Jersey Institute of Technology

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RONALD H. ROCKLAND is Associate Dean of the Newark College of Engineering, and a Professor of Engineering Technology and Biomedical Engineering. He received a B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. in bioengineering and electrical engineering from New York University in 1967, 1969 and 1972 respectively. He also received an M.B.A. in marketing from the University of St. Thomas in 1977. He is a 2000 award winner in Excellence in Teaching for NJIT, a 2004 recipient of the F.J. Berger award from ASEE, and the chair of the Master Teaches committee. Dr. Rockland has over 25 years of industrial experience in research, engineering, marketing and sales management with several high technology corporations.

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Mark OShea CSU Monterey Bay

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MARK R. O'SHEA is a Professor of Education at California State University - Monterey Bay. He is a regular consultant to the Center for Pre-COllege Programs at NJIT. He is the author of From Standards to Success: A Guide for School Leaders published by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Dr. O'Shea has worked closely with NJIT colleagues in the development of standards-based instructional practices.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Rubric to Evaluate Standard-Based Lesson Plans and Students’ Achievement of the Standard Abstract

Standards-based lesson plans requires a different way of planning that includes an alignment of student work expectations and classroom assessments to the standards and the learning objectives and expected outcomes of the lesson, and establishment of criteria by which it can be determined whether students have achieved the particular standard or indicator. Teachers need to learn how to align their teaching practices with the state content standards and how to develop and implement standards-based lesson plans. A rubric has been developed to evaluate teachers’ standards-based lesson plans based a set of criteria for developing effective standards-based lesson plans. The rubric has been pilot tested and Kappa statistics have been calculated to evaluate the reliability of the rubric as a method to evaluate the effectiveness of standard-based lesson planning and the impact it has on student learning.

Introduction

Typically, state content standards, derived and/or developed from national standards, are designed to provide minimum competencies and provide the scientific and technological knowledge needed for modern society. Districts develop curricula from state standards, and teachers develop lesson plans for the classroom using the district curricula. Curricular materials in support of the integration of engineering into science instruction have been made available through professional organizations such as ASME and IEEE, as well as through universities and teacher-developed lesson plans1-7. However, only concepts included in the standards are taught in the classroom, as teachers believe they will only be accountable for what is in the standards. As a result, students who take only the minimally required science classes, as opposed to advanced placement classes, will only learn what is included in the standards. Usually the only curriculum materials considered, let alone implemented, are those that reinforce state content standards, since student achievement (and schools’ and districts’ achievement) is measured largely by student performance on statewide assessment tests8. So, if teachers are to make engineering principles a part of their instruction for student learning, then engineering principles and design must be a part of the state science standards. Unfortunately, most existing engineering curricula lack an appropriate translation into standards-achieving lessons for enriching the science curriculum. Translation into standards-achieving lessons is critical.

Aligning with Standards

Most states have promulgated content standards in important subject matter, and school districts are working on the alignment of their curricula. Curriculum frameworks have been prepared, lesson and unit plans have been revised, and new assessments are intended to measure achievement of the standards by students at all grade levels. Unfortunately, the adoption of content standards hasn’t as yet had a significant impact in science classrooms8.

Most school districts focus on other means besides lesson plans in their efforts to become “standards based.” The textbook adoption process is a popular approach. Textbook adoption

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015