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A Scholarship Recruitment And Selection Strategy That Successfully Attracts Diverse And Academically Talented Freshmen

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

FPD5 -- Placement & Early Success

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

12.108.1 - 12.108.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3014

Download Count

42

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Paper Authors

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Christopher Papadopoulos

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Chris Papadopoulos is Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering and Mechanics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is the PI of the UWM Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics
> Scholarship Program. His teaching and research interests are in engineeing mechanics, structural stability, engineering ethics, and engineering education. He is a recipient of the 2006 Ferdinand P. Beer and E. Russell Johnston, Jr. Outstanding New Mechanics Educator Award through the Mechanics Division of ASEE.

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Karen Brucks University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

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Karen M Brucks is Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences at the University of
Wisconsin Milwaukee. Her research interests are in Low Dimensional Dynamical Systems. She is a former Fulbright Scholar will be teaching at the NSF funded Summer Mathematics Program to held at Carleton College in Summer 2007. She is Co-PI of the UWM Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics Scholarship Program.

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Eric Key University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

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Eric Key is a Professor of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is a Co-PI for the UWM Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics Scholarship Program and a Senior Scientist for the NSF supported Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership, as well as the Assistant Chairperson of the Mathematical Sciences Department and co-director of UWM's Actuarial Science program. His teaching and research interests are in probability theory and linear algebra.

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Ethan Munson University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

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Ethan Munson is Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is co-PI of the UWM Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics Scholarship Program. His teaching and research interests are in document engineering, software engineering and human-computer interaction. He is chair of ACM SIGWEB, the Special Interest Group on Hypertext, Hypermedia and the Web.

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K Vairavan University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

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K. Vairavan is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a Co-Director of the Medical Informatics PhD program at the University of Wisconsin-Miwaukee. His technical interests include distributed systems, software complexity, medical informatics, and computer science and engineering education.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Scholarship Recruitment and Selection Strategy that Successfully Attracts Diverse and Academically Talented Freshmen

Abstract

We describe recruitment and selection procedures of the Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarship (CSEMS) Program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee that are designed to attract students who are academically talented, financially needy, and diverse. In particular, we address the possible exclusion of underrepresented minority students that could result if standardized test scores are used indiscriminately as metrics of student performance in both recruitment and selection procedures. We describe a “conditional award” process that enables students whose calculus placement is moderately below calculus to competitively apply for and receive scholarships; awards to such students are activated on the condition that they attempt to attain calculus placement prior to matriculation. We present data that demonstrate moderate effectiveness of these methods in fostering diversity among our scholars and reasonably encouraging retention and estimated graduation rates. We discuss areas of improvement for future program years, such as forging new partnerships with local Project Lead The Way high schools to recruit higher numbers of females and minorities, and developing new mentoring opportunities to reduce attrition, especially among underrepresented minority students.

1. Introduction

The Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarship (CSEMS) Program was authorized by Congress as part of the American Competitiveness and Workforce Act of 1998. It is administered by the National Science Foundation’s Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE). The program was modified in 2004 and is now known as the Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) Program. The CSEMS Program supports academically talented students, financially needy students for study in the “targeted disciplines” of computer science, engineering, and mathematics; the S-STEM program will additionally support study in other natural sciences. Although metrics of financial need are established by the federal government, participating institutions interpret thresholds for academic merit and financial need based on local circumstances. In addition to supporting students with financial need, the CSEMS and S-STEM programs broadly aim to increase the number of students – particularly traditionally underrepresented students – who choose study, attain degrees, and ultimately seek employment in the STEM disciplines.

In 2002, the College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) and the College of Letters and Science (L&S) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) received a grant to establish a CSEMS Program. Our program was designed to respond to the following circumstances: (1) only about 30% of incoming freshmen in the targeted disciplines (engineering, computer science, and mathematics) are placed at calculus; (2) many students take courses out of sequence (e.g. approximately 30% of students in “sophomore” Dynamics are seniors); and (3) being financially needy, approximately 75% of UWM students work at least 20 hours per week to support their

Papadopoulos, C., & Brucks, K., & Key, E., & Munson, E., & Vairavan, K. (2007, June), A Scholarship Recruitment And Selection Strategy That Successfully Attracts Diverse And Academically Talented Freshmen Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/3014

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015