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A Super Department Model for Multi-University Collaboration

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Electrical and Computer Division Poster Session

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

8

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36618

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36618

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Kenneth A. Connor Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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Kenneth Connor is an emeritus professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (ECSE) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) where he taught courses on electromagnetics, electronics and instrumentation, plasma physics, electric power, and general engineering. His research involves plasma physics, electromagnetics, photonics, biomedical sensors, engineering education, diversity in the engineering workforce, and technology enhanced learning. He learned problem solving from his father (who ran a gray iron foundry), his mother (a nurse) and grandparents (dairy farmers). He has had the great good fortune to always work with amazing people, most recently the members and leadership of the Inclusive Engineering Consortium (IEC) from HBCU and HSI ECE programs and the faculty, staff and students of the Lighting Enabled Systems and Applications (LESA) ERC, where he was Education Director until his retirement in 2018. He was RPI ECSE Department Head from 2001 to 2008 and served on the board of the ECE Department Heads Association (ECEDHA) from 2003 to 2008. He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE.

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Pamela Leigh-Mack Virginia State University

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Dr. Pamela Leigh-Mack is Professor and Chair of the Department of Engineering at Virginia State University. She received the B.S. degree in Mathematics from Virginia Union University, B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering (EE) from Howard University, and the Ph.D. degree in EE from the University of Delaware. Among her professional affiliations are the American Society for Engineering Education, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and the Society of Women Engineers. Dr. Leigh-Mack continues her many years of service as a program evaluator for ABET, reviewing programs nationally and internationally. She has a strong interest in STEM education including retention in engineering; accreditation and assessment; pedagogical innovations; and diversity in the STEM fields, particularly for women.

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Craig J. Scott Morgan State University

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Dr. Craig J. Scott received his Ph.D. and B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Howard University and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University. He is currently serving as professor and chairperson of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at one of the nation’s preeminent public urban research institutions, Morgan State University. His career spans over twenty-eight years of progressive scholarly experience in such areas as research administration/ implementation, pedagogical innovation, international collaboration, strategic planning, promoting community engagement and academic program development. He instructs courses in computer vision, computer graphics, electromagnetics and characterization of semiconductor materials.

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Mohamed F. Chouikha Prairie View A&M University

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Dr. Mohamed Chouikha is a professor and chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Howard University. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Colorado–Boulder. Dr. Chouikha’s research interests include machine learning, intelligent control, and multimedia signal processing communications for secure networks, among other areas. He also focuses on enhancing recruitment and retention of underrepresented minorities in the STEM areas in general, engineering in particular.

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John C. Kelly North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

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Dr. John C. Kelly, Jr. is an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Delaware. Dr. Kelly’s research interests include hardware security in cyber-physical systems and embedded systems security. He also contributes to research on engineering education, enhanced retention of underrepresented minorities in engineering, and hands-on learning techniques.

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Miguel Velez-Reyes University of Texas at El Paso Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-6983-7250

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Dr. Miguel Velez-Reyes is the George W. Edwards Distinguished Professor in Engineering and Chair of the ECE Department at University of Texas at El Paso. He received his BSEE degree from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) in 1985, and his SMEE, and PhD from MIT in 1988 and 1992 respectively. He was a faculty member of the UPRM ECE Department from 1992 to 2012. He is the UTEP Campus Coordinator for the NOAA Center for Earth Systems Science and Remote Sensing Technology. He was the Founding Director of the UPRM Institute for Research in Integrative Systems and Engineering, and Associate Director of the NSF CenSSIS ERC. His research interests are in integrating physical models with data driven approaches for information extraction using remote or minimally intrusive sensing. He has over 160 publications. He is Fellow of SPIE and the Academy of Arts and Sciences of Puerto Rico. Received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers award from the US President in 1997. He chairs the SPIE Conference on Algorithms, Technologies and Applications for Multispectral, and Hyperspectral Imaging. He is board member of the Inclusive Engineering Consortium (IEC).

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Shiny Abraham Seattle University

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Shiny Abraham is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Seattle University. She received the B.E. degree in Telecommunication Engineering from Visveswaraiah Technological University (VTU), India in 2007 and Ph.D. from Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA in 2012. Her research interests span the areas of Wireless Communication, Internet of Things (IoT), Optimization using Game Theory, and Engineering Education Research. She is a member of the IEEE and ASEE, a technical program committee member for IEEE Globecom, ICC, ICCCN and VTC conferences, and a reviewer for several international journals and conferences.

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Megan Bekolay

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Otsebele E. Nare Hampton University

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Otsebele Nare is an Associate Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Hampton University, VA. He received his electrical engineering doctorate from Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, in 2005. His research interests include Multiobjective System Level Synthesis Techniques and K-16 Integrative STEM education.

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Abdelnasser A. Eldek Jackson State University

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Dr. Abdelnasser A. Eldek obtained his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2004 from the University of Mississippi. Currently, he is Professor and Coordinator of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Jackson State University. His main research areas include Applied Electromagnetics, Antennas, Phased Arrays, RF/Microwave Circuits, Metamaterial, and Numerical Methods.

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Mandoye Ndoye Tuskegee University

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Mandoye Ndoye received the B.S.E.E. degree from the Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, in 2002, the MS degree in Mathematics and the Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2010. After completing his Ph.D. studies, he joined the Center of Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a Research Staff Member. From 2012 to 2014, he was a Research Associate at Howard University. Since 2014, he has been an Assistant Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL. His research interests center on signal/image processing, sensor data analytics, intelligent infrastructure systems, power systems optimization and engineering education for under-represented groups.

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Abstract

Since 2013, a partnership of Electrical and Computer Engineering programs from nearly 20 Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) have been collaborating to produce more and better-prepared graduates by leveraging connections between partner institutions and outside organizations from academia, government and industry. Key to the success of this collaboration has been the development of a virtual working community of practice through regular online and in-person meetings, resource and idea sharing, collaborative assessment and publication/dissemination of results, advocacy and mentoring for one another, and mutual trust. The lessons learned have led the partners to form a non-profit organization to provide the infrastructure to support joint activities and programs. This new organization has enabled the group to expand the collaboration scope to address the full learning and working experience of students and faculty and include other MSIs. Its vision is to be a collaboration of Minority Serving Institutions Working as One organized as a virtual super department with broadly based strengths in education, scholarship and service. In time, the organization will grow and the model being developed replicated and implemented for other disciplines. The driving hypotheses being explored by the organization are: (1) many activities historically undertaken by traditional departments can achieve either higher levels of success and/or success in new areas when developed and implemented by multi-institutional teams; (2) resources and support programs can be effectively shared across many institutions; (3) improvement science, specifically professional development addressing key topics such as teaching, advising, team science, communication, leadership and program management can build capabilities at all partner institutions and breakdown historical barriers to collaboration; (4) the combination of collective experiences and resources with diverse student populations can enable students to achieve greater success and to build personal networks; and (5) alliances built with outside entities can be established and nurtured on a level playing field with external entities by working collectively with other organization partners rather than as individual departments.

Connor, K. A., & Leigh-Mack, P., & Scott, C. J., & Chouikha, M. F., & Kelly, J. C., & Velez-Reyes, M., & Abraham, S., & Bekolay, M., & Nare, O. E., & Eldek, A. A., & Ndoye, M. (2021, July), A Super Department Model for Multi-University Collaboration Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36618

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