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A Survey Of Biological And Agricultural Engineering Female Faculty In North America

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

4.43.1 - 4.43.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7960

Download Count

153

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Paper Authors

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Stephanie Cauble

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Ann D. Christy

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Marybeth Lima

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3592

A Survey of Biological and Agricultural Engineering Female Faculty in North America Stephanie Cauble Ann Christy Marybeth Lima Louisiana State University Ohio State University Louisiana State University

Abstract

While females make up approximately 19% of college graduates receiving B.S. degrees in engineering, they account for less than 3% of engineering faculty positions in North America (Trautner 1996). One discipline that is overcoming some of the barriers of this leaky pipeline is Biological and Agricultural Engineering (BAE), in which women comprise approximately 7% of the faculty. We designed a confidential survey for this group based on personal and academic history, career issues, and opinions and experiences. Our goals were to identify factors that have led to the success of these women faculty, and to make recommendations to better integrate women into all engineering disciplines. Results (based on a 53% response rate) showed that BAE departments provide a supportive environment, and that the female undergraduate student population is 40% or higher in 65% of the BAE programs. The majority of respondents reported that gender discrimination was not a job issue, and believe that the attraction of women to BAE is due to its emphasis on biological systems, as well as BAE’s newness and lack of long-standing stereotypes of male dominance. Recommendations are to increase mentoring at all levels of education and work and to increase networking of female faculty within universities.

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Cauble, S., & Christy, A. D., & Lima, M. (1999, June), A Survey Of Biological And Agricultural Engineering Female Faculty In North America Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/7960

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