Asee peer logo

A University Tribal Colleges High Schools Partnership To Increase Native American College Graduates In Mathematics, Science, And Engineering

Download Paper |

Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Minorities in Research

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

9.121.1 - 9.121.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/13781

Download Count

81

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

G. Padmanabhan

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

3270

A University-Tribal Colleges-High Schools Partnership to Increase Native American College Graduates in Mathematics, Science and Engineering

G. Padmanabhan, Wei Lin, Robert Pieri, Floyd Patterson, Sharon Cobb North Dakota State University, P.O. Box 5285, Fargo, ND 58105

Carol Davis Turtle Mountain Community College, P.O. Box 340, Belcourt, ND 58316

Abstract Over the last two decades, the relatively small percentage of Native American (NA) students earning science and engineering degrees has not increased in spite of the fact that one third of NA first-year students enrolled in four-year colleges and universities had the intention of majoring in science or engineering, according to a 1998 survey. Recent declines in engineering enrollment among the underrepresented minorities are disproportionately higher than the decline among non-minority students. Several factors including lack of adequate pre-college preparation, academic intervention programs, and financial assistance could contribute to the current situation. Regardless, programs to increase NA participation in and successful completion of engineering degrees are needed. Such programs need to render the pathways of NA students from middle school through tribal colleges to universities smooth. Activities directed toward pre- college students in such programs need to involve tribal college, university, and school faculty in the development and implementation of those activities. This paper describes the experience of the authors in a multi-year, multi-site project funded by the Office of Naval Research providing enhancement activities for reservation middle and high school students and activities to facilitate smooth transfer of tribal college students to four-year colleges or universities. The student activities in the project were planned, designed and implemented jointly by tribal college, university, and high school teachers. The program has been a success not only in terms of the increased student enrollment in the activities but also by systemically impacting tribal college, university, and high school faculty. A core group continues to work together for the continuation and improvement of the activities. The paper focuses on the partnership development and the systemic impact of the project. For brevity details of the project activities are not included, but will be made available for discussion at the conference.

I. Introduction There is concern among the Native American (NA) educators nationally about the lack of NA participation in science, mathematics and engineering (SME)careers. Over the last two decades, the relatively small percentage of NA students earning science and engineering degrees has not increased in spite of the fact that one third of NA first-year students enrolled in four-year colleges and universities had the intention of majoring in science and engineering, according to a

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Padmanabhan, G. (2004, June), A University Tribal Colleges High Schools Partnership To Increase Native American College Graduates In Mathematics, Science, And Engineering Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/13781

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2004 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015