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A View From The High School/Two Year College Partnership Interface: Our Best Practices Employed In Engineering And Technology Education

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Best Practices for Two-Year Students Majoring in Engineering & STEM Fields

Tagged Division

Two Year College Division

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

27

Page Numbers

26.131.1 - 26.131.27

DOI

10.18260/p.23472

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23472

Download Count

64

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Paper Authors

biography

Dave Galley Collin College

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Dave Galley (MSEE, MBA, BSEE) serves as the Director of Engineering for Collin College. Recently, based on his work and that of the Collin College faculty in STEM education, the Collin College Engineering and Technology Department won the coveted 2014 Tech Titans of the Future University Level Award from the DFW Metroplex Technology Business Council (MTBC). In addition, through his work in higher education, he was selected to receive the prestigious 2014 "Wylie Way" award. He has presented an NSF workshop on and authored a variety of papers/presentations in the critical field of student pipeline success in STEM education. Galley is the Collin College co-PI for the Dallas STEM Gateways Collaborative NSF STEP Grant led by the University of Texas at Dallas. Finally, Galley sits on the STEM Advisory Board of the MTBC. Prior to joining Collin College, Galley was a Senior Engineering Fellow, a Senior Scientist and a Senior Manager in the semiconductor industry working for companies such as ATMEL, Raytheon Corporate and Harris Semiconductor. He brings more than twenty-five years of Silicon Valley based industrial technology experience to his role in the education space. He has authored numerous technical publications/presentations in semiconductor engineering and plasma processing. His current interests focus on the recruitment, retention and success of STEM pipeline students from high school through the university and into the workplace.

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Gena S Martin Collin College

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Gena Martin (MBA, BBA) serves in the Engineering and Technology Department at Collin College. Recently, based on her work and that of the Collin College faculty in STEM education, specifically in the area of Technical Dual Credit, the Collin College Engineering and Technology Department won the coveted 2014 Tech Titans of the Future University Level Award from the DFW Metroplex Technology Business Council (MTBC). After her time at Baylor University, Martin’s education career began in secondary education. Since 2007, she has focused on the critical interface between higher education and secondary education. In 2011, she joined Collin College as the Career and Technical Education Coordinator specifically working with technical dual credit students. Recently, after working closely with the department, she joined the Engineering and Technology Department of Collin College assisting students on the high school level, on the college level, and in industry who plan to pursue STEM degrees. Further, through her work with industry on the MTBC STEM Advisory Board, she coordinates key industrial connections for the department. Her current interests focus on the recruitment, retention and success of STEM pipeline students from high school through the university and into the workplace.

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biography

Jeannie Christine Stone Wylie Independent School District

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Dr. Jeannie Stone began her career in Dallas ISD as a middle school English teacher in 1989. Prior to assuming her current role as Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction in Wylie ISD, Dr. Stone served as a high school teacher, high school assistant principal, high school principal, and other administrative positions. This is her 25th year in public education. Dr. Stone believes in the importance of individualized learning for every student, and she is committed to creating meaningful pathways for all students to ensure their success both while in school and beyond. She is passionate about developing best practices to create greatness in every public school classroom.

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biography

Becky Hunt Allen Independent School District

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Becky Hunt (MEd in Administration, BS in Education) serves as the Director of Career & Technical Education, for Allen Independent School District. Recently based on her work guiding the Career & Technical Education (CTE) programs a new advanced engineering program is offered at Allen High School. She coordinates a CTE advisory committee made up of business partners, who provide guidance to program improvement. The advisory committee is evolving into a dynamic team that listens to new trends in industry and the workforce. Hunt has over 25 years in education. Prior to joining Allen ISD, she was the CTE Director, for a large school district in Texas. In 2007, she was the Outstanding CTE Administrator, in Texas. From 2008-2011, she served on the board for the Career & Technology Administrators of Texas. She has designed and implemented CTE programs in high wage and high demand areas. Her current interests focus on high school engineering programs, marketing strategies that attract younger girls into engineering careers, innovative engineering programs, building a vertical curriculum, and providing seamless transitions for students from high school through the university and into the workplace.

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Jean Laswell Rockwall Independent School District

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Jean Laswell (MACTE, BBA) serves as a Coordinator for Career Technical Education (CTE), STEM and Robotics for Rockwall Independent School District (RISD). Recently, based on her work in education, Rockwall ISD was selected to participate in the DFW Metroplex Technology Business Council STEM initiatives. Laswell serves as a member of the Board of Directors for two organizations: the Career-Technical Educators of North Texas and Interlink, Inc., a regional nonprofit alliance bridging the gap between business, education and government to develop a quality workforce with a globally competitive advantage. In her role as RISD CTE Coordinator, Laswell is responsible for STEM programs including curriculum development, educator professional learning, dual credit, student recruitment, and collaboration with business and industry through the Rockwall ISD Career Education Advisory Board. Recently, Laswell has presented at state and national conferences including the Career-Technical Association of Texas, the National Career Clusters Institute, and the National Science Teachers Association. Prior to her work in education administration, Laswell was a secondary educator teaching STEM courses in computer science, robotics and engineering and was selected as a 2011 Teacher-of-the-Year. Laswell also brings more than 20 years of experience in business, including extensive work as a marketing research consultant for STEM-related businesses and organizations. Her current interests focus on curriculum and instructional design to grow the STEM pipeline through recruitment, retention and placement from high school to post-secondary and career.

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Lynn Mortensen Retired Raytheon Company

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Lynn Mortensen (BSCS) serves the North Texas community promoting STEM education through her participation as a member of the Metroplex Technology Business Council STEM Talent Team, the University of Texas at Dallas Jonsson School of Engineering Industry Advisory Council, the University of Texas at Arlington Engineering School Board of Advisors, and Collin College Convergence Technology Business Leadership Team. Mortensen is currently following her passion as a STEM advocate and volunteer after spending 30 plus years in the aerospace and defense industry. She started her career as a Computer Scientist with a degree from California State Polytechnic University Pomona. She retired from the Raytheon Company in 2013 having held many positions within the company in program management, product development and engineering management including vice president of engineering of a $3B business segment. During her career, Mortensen was the recipient of several awards including the Malcom R. Currie Innovation Award and Raytheon Womens Network Woman to Watch Award. In 2011, she was selected as a Women Worth Watching in Technology from the Diversity Journal. As a member of the Dallas Society of Women Engineers Outreach Committee and an active volunteer at FIRST and BEST robotics, she continues to share her experiences with the next generation of engineers in the hope of increasing the number and diversity of engineers for the future.

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John W. Sibert The University of Texas at Dallas

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John Sibert obtained his B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of South Florida and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin under the direction of Professor Jonathan Sessler. He was then awarded a National Institutes of Health Post-Doctoral Fellowship with Professor Brian Hoffman at Northwestern University. He is currently an associate professor of chemistry at The University of Texas at Dallas with research interests that lie in the area of molecular architecture, designing and building new molecules for applications that span from medicine to environmental science to advanced new materials. He is an author, inventor and award-winning teacher with an educational emphasis on engaging learners in innovative methods centered around curiosity and discovery. He co-wrote UT-Dallas’ campus-wide education plan titled “Gateways to Excellence in Math and Science (GEMS)” and has appeared as a science advisor for ABC and CBS News. He is a member and the president-elect of the UT System Academy of Distinguished Teachers.

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Abstract

A View From The High School/Two Year College Partnership Interface: Our Best Practices Employed In Engineering And Technology EducationOur Two-Year College, three Independent School District (ISD) partners and our Universitypartner have established a joint effort to significantly increase the students engaged in Science,Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)1 with the ultimate goal of having thesestudents join the STEM workforce after a two-year degree, a 2 (AS) + 2 (BS) pathway or a four-year degree. Building upon previous cooperation among these institutions, best practice methodshave been identified and are being implemented to bring about a cultural change that will lead toa sustained increase in the production of STEM-trained graduates needed by local high-techbusinesses. In order to expand the diameter of the STEM pipeline, new non-traditional studentpopulations must be recruited and not traditionally “weeded-out.” Our research and BestPractices center on two specific populations: females and non-top 15% students that areconsidering whether college is part of their pathway. Our experience is that boys need“confirmation” to continue strongly in engineering, whereas girls need “confirmation” only after“affirmation” and “visualization.” Therefore, based on our NSF recognized Robotics CampModel, unique models for our “All-Girls” Robotics Camp and for our “Girls Night Out WithFemale Engineers” utilize female speakers/mentors/role models from industry to aid the girls inthe “affirmation”/“visualization” process. The format, logistics, and assessments utilized to reachthis population are presented2,3,4,5.Our work builds upon a very successful five year NSF STEM Talent Expansion Program (STEP)grant in which curriculum alignment and clean college/university articulations wereaccomplished. In this work, we present results of concerted efforts across the high school/two-year college interface that have resulted in clear flowcharted articulated pathways for students tosuccessfully navigate. The effort to strengthen recruitment into introductory engineering coursestaken in high school as technical dual college credit (TDC) has produced significant results.After studying five TDC years6,7, we find that of all the students who participated in TDCclasses, 59% of those students took only TDC classes and did not take academic dual creditcourses. This finding is critical to Best Practice recruiting (particularly for non-top 15% students)and shows a unique way to increase the number of students attending college classes.At the college entry level, it is very important to create support bridges for incoming studentretention and persistence7,8. Best Practices are presented showing an engaged Robotics club thatsupports ASEE competitions/the aforementioned outreach camps and the utilization of uniquetwo-year college student chapters of professional organizations such as the Society of WomenEngineers and the Information Systems Security Association.As the end goal is to produce students with relevant skill sets for local industry, strategies thatresult in “industry in the classroom” through interaction with local business councils, corporateadvisory boards with members who are engaged across the “interface,” and through the use of aunique industry match-making website resource are described. In conclusion, our presentationhighlights unique approaches that attempt to encourage and to minimize the hurdles confrontedby a potential STEM student9.References 1. Augustine, N. R., Barrett, C. R., Cassell, G., Chu, S., Gates, R. M., Grasmick, N. S., Holliday, C. O., Jackson, S. A., Jones, A. K., Lederberg, J., Levin, R., Mote, C. D., Murray, C., O’Donnell, P., Raymond, L. R., Richardson, R. C., Vagelos, P. R., Vest, C. M., Whitesides, G. M., Zare, R. N., 2007, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, National Academies Press, Washington, DC. 2. Holdren, J.P. and Lander, E. (2012). “Engage to Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.” Washington, D.C.: 2012 Report to the President. 3. Crumpton-Young, L., Elde, A. and Ambrose, K. (2014). “Mentoring Practices Proven to Broaden Participation in STEM Disciplines.” 2014 121st ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition (Indianapolis), Paper #10508. 4. Perez-Castillejos, R. and Santhanam, P.R. (2014). “Student-led Mentoring Program Fostering Retention of Female Undergraduate Students in STEM Fields.” 2014 121st ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition (Indianapolis), Paper #10147. 5. STEM Connector (2014). “Million Women Mentors: Advancing Women and Girls in STEM Careers Through Mentoring.” STEM Connector, www.MillionWomenMentors.org. 6. The American Institutes For Research (March 2011). “Research Study of Texas Dual Credit Programs and Courses.” Submitted to: Texas Education Agency, 2011. 7. Adelman, C. (2006). “The Toolbox Revisited: Paths to Degree Completion from High School Through College.” Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education. 8. Christe, B. (2013, July-September). “The Importance of Faculty-Student Connections in STEM Disciplines: A Literature Review.” Journal of STEM Education , 14(3), 22-26. 15. 9. Brown, F., Trampus, K. and Odell, M. (2009). “The Path to STEM Careers: Student Perceptions of College Pathways and Barriers to Success.” 2009 ASEE Gulf-Southwest Annual Conference (Baylor University), Session TB1-4 7th -10th Robotics Camps, Engineering Nights STEM Need Driven Service 7th -10th Robotics Camps, Engineering Nights Engaged Advisory Boards Professional Community Service 10th - 12th Technical Dual Credit (TDC) Student Flow3 Independent School District Partners Student Flow Two-Year College Partner Students Have Needed Skill Set Engaged Industry Clear Articulation Partners Engaged Robotics Club Student Flow Student Flow Curriculum SWE & ISSA Chapters Clear Articulation Four-Year University Partner Students Have7 8 9 10 11 12 Partnership Needed Skill Set Copy Exact University Partner Coursework Middle School High School Student Flow The High School/Two-Year College Partnership Interface In Perspective

Galley, D., & Martin, G. S., & Stone, J. C., & Hunt, B., & Laswell, J., & Mortensen, L., & Sibert, J. W. (2015, June), A View From The High School/Two Year College Partnership Interface: Our Best Practices Employed In Engineering And Technology Education Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.23472

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015