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A Wearable Wireless System For Unobtrusive Measurement Of Human Motion

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Collection

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

DEED Poster Session

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

14.142.1 - 14.142.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4731

Download Count

42

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Paper Authors

biography

Chao Chen Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne

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Dr. Chao Chen is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Engineering at Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2003 and 2005. She also holds B.E. and M.E. degrees from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China in 1998 and 2001, respectively. Her current research interests include routing in mobile ad hoc networks, sensor networks, and space-based communication networks, modeling and performance evaluation of wireless opportunistic networks, and network security.

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Carlos Pomalaza-Ráez Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne

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Scott Hendershot Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne

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Ma Oo Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne

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Adam Hilton Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Wearable Wireless System for Unobtrusive Measurement of Human Motion Abstract

Assessing abnormal movement resulting from poor health is essential for monitoring patients’ health status and quality of life. In this paper, we describe a capstone senior design project that uses wearable wireless sensors to measure and collect signals with information about the motion of a person in need of medical care. A triaxial body-fixed accelerometer is used to record human motion. Sampled data are transmitted using an IEEE 802.15.4 wireless transceiver to a data logger and passed to a PC. The analysis of the recorded data facilitates possible characterization of human motion. The implemented system allows for inexpensive and unobtrusive monitoring during normal daily activities at home or in a nursing home environment.

1. Introduction

Today’s health care systems are burdened by the increasing number of the elderly and persons with disabilities needing medical support. New technologies are being used to provide improved support for people bounded in their homes and assisted living environments. Thanks to the development of communication and sensor technologies, a smart home health care scenario is possible where patients can stay at home and have their vital physiological signs monitored. When an abnormal condition occurs, the health monitoring system can detect it and notify the caregivers. Thus, the patients can receive assessment and treatment in a timely manner.

In this paper, we describe a capstone senior design project that uses wearable wireless sensors to measure and collect signals with information about the motion of a person in need of medical care. A triaxial waist-mounted accelerometer is used to measure human motion. Sampled data are wirelessly transmitted and recorded for a careful processing. Through the analysis of the recorded data, it is therefore possible to characterize and classify human motion events such as sitting, standing, rotation, walking, and jumping. The implemented system allows for inexpensive and unobtrusive monitoring during normal daily activities at home or in a nursing home environment.

The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. The system architecture and selection of the key components are described in Section 2. The detailed design and implementation of the system is explained in Section 3. Section 4 presents the experimental results and Section 5 concludes this paper.

2. Project Description

The capstone senior design course in the Department of Engineering at Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne lasts for two semesters. Students are teamed in groups and work on different design projects. They need to record their progress in milestone reports throughout the semesters. The problem statement, conceptual designs, design evaluation and selection, and detailed design are finished in the first semester. The prototype development, test and analysis are done in the second semester. At the end of both semesters, the students are required to

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