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A Wireless Communications And Networking Course Developed For Electrical Engineering And Computer Engineering Technology Programs

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Computer Engineering Technology Curriculum

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

12.157.1 - 12.157.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2631

Download Count

73

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Paper Authors

biography

Xuefu Zhou University of Cincinnati

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Xuefu Zhou is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology at the University of Cincinnati. He received both his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Cincinnati in 2002 and 2006, respectively. He also holds a M.S. degree (1995) in Mechatronics from Huazhong University of Science and Technology. From 1995 to 2000, he worked as an Engineer, Senior Engineer and Project Manager in the high-tech industry on the design, development of Distributed Control Systems (DCS) and Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. His expertise and current research interests lie on wireless communications, wireless and mobile networks, cross-layer design for wireless networks, signal processing, DCS and SCADA systems. He is a member of IEEE and ASEE.

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James Everly University of Cincinnati

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James O. Everly is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology at the University of Cincinnati. He received a BSEE and MSEE from The Ohio State University in 1969 and 1970, respectively. He is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a registered professional engineer in the state of Ohio. He is currently Chair of the IEEE Cincinnati Section, and in 1997 he received the IEEE Professional Achievement Award. He has held several research and management positions in industry working for such companies as Battelle's Columbus Laboratories, Rockwell International, and Claspan Corporation. He joined the University of Cincinnati in 1985.

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Max Rabiee University of Cincinnati

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Max Rabiee is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology (ECET) at the University of Cincinnati. He earned his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Kentucky in 1987. Dr. Rabiee has been a registered professional engineer since 1988, and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE). He is also a member of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE), the Eta Kappa Nu Electrical Engineering Honor Society, and the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Wireless Communication and Networking Course Developed for Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering Technology Program

Abstract

During the past decade, wireless communication has become a ubiquitous technology. The booming application of wireless communication and its fast developing technology have caused significant social and technological impacts. Despite its rising importance, wireless communication and wireless networks are not commonly studied in an Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology program. As a part of our curriculum continuous improvement plan, faculty members in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology department at the University of Cincinnati felt it very important to teach students the current wireless and mobile communication technologies, and to let them gain hands-on experiences with the application of wireless technologies. Thus, we proposed a new course to introduce wireless communication and wireless networks in 2006. The new course has been strongly supported by local industry as well as the department's industrial advisor committee. The new course has been offered twice in 2006 and received very positive student responses. This paper describes the course information, lecture topics, laboratory exercises, student feedback, and the instructor’s reflections.

1. Introduction

Wireless computing is a rapidly emerging technology which offers network connectivity thereby minimizing the need for a wired connection and thus supports the concept of mobility. Wireless technology has already become the most exciting area in telecommunications and networks. The rapid growth of wireless and mobile telephones, satellite communication, wireless local area networks (WLAN), wireless personal area networks (WPAN) and wireless metropolitan area networks (WMAN) and the applications of wireless internet are generating tremendous changes in the telecommunication industry and results in significant impact to the society. For example, businesses are increasing their reliance on wireless networks and developing the requisite infrastructure to implement and integrate wireless technologies into their existing networks. A new market analysis report in November 2006 from The Insight Research Corporation [1] predicts that service revenues in the global telecommunications industry will reach $1.3 trillion by the close of 2007, with continued strong growth in wireless leading the way. According to the new industry market study, wireless service revenues are expected to grow at a compounded rate of nearly 10 percent over the next few years, while wired service revenues grow much more modestly at two percent.

Continual growth in the wireless industry can be attributed to several reasons. First, wireless networks provide an alternative to the high installation and maintenance costs incurred by the traditional infrastructure of wired networks. Second, wireless/mobile networks not only offer mobility but also extend the capability to the traditional networks. For example, WLANs can be set up in some environments such as old buildings and museums where traditional wiring is prohibited or impossible. Also, wireless networks have advantages in some operational environments where the network is only operational for a short time. Having gone far beyond

Zhou, X., & Everly, J., & Rabiee, M. (2007, June), A Wireless Communications And Networking Course Developed For Electrical Engineering And Computer Engineering Technology Programs Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2631

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