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Abandoning The Lecture:Using Job Meetings To Teach Within An International, Project Based Learning Environment

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Architectural Engineering Education I

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

10.113.1 - 10.113.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15323

Download Count

23

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Paper Authors

author page

William Adamson

author page

Cluny Way

author page

David Cowan

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

ABANDONING THE LECTURE: USING JOB MEETINGS TO TEACH WITHIN AN INTERNATIONAL, PROJECT-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

David Jan Cowan Indiana University/Purdue University/Indianapolis (IUPUI)

Abstract

This paper looks at the notion that lecturing is not necessarily the most appropriate delivery method for Architectural Engineering Technology courses that rely heavily upon recreating the work environment within the classroom. The architectural project method is one that is time-tested in architectural design schools, yet has been less embraced within engineering and technology courses that tend to have a history of teacher-centered, lecture-based teaching methods. The project - based method also mimics the architectural industry, where information is often dispensed in meetings rather than in formal lectures. To create a realistic portrayal of industry, and to manage a unique project that will be discussed herein, job meetings were used to dispense information rather than teacher-centered lectures. The discussion in this paper is based upon the use of job meetings within a particular course: Residential Construction. The prime purpose of this course is to produce a set of working drawings for a wood framed house. This paper reflects upon a unique, international project developed for this course that involved three countries (Canada, the United States, and Indonesia). In an attempt to organize the large quantity of information that was generated through E-mails, digital photos and video conferences, job meetings were introduced into the classroom as a means of quickly relaying information and delivering course content. Rotating job captains were designated as information gate-keepers that had to organize and lead meetings. As the information dispensed from other students in other countries often lacked critical detail and finely-honed English, the job meetings served as a daily place to gain and sort out valuable information relevant to keep the project moving ahead. All of this was documented and kept within a learning portfolio/ binder that kept records of the paper chase throughout the project.

1.0 Introduction

The following paper examines the notion that lecturing is not necessarily the most appropriate delivery method for Architectural Engineering Technology courses that rely heavily upon recreating the work environment within the classroom. In contrast to lecture based teaching, the project - based method (one that is time-tested in architectural design schools) mimics architectural industry, where information is often dispensed in meetings rather than in formal lectures.

This paper addresses the dearth of architectural research that focuses upon design methods and education. Most research done by architectural educators, as noted by Voyatzaki 1 “focuses on history, technology, social sciences and urban studies,… computer sciences and urban studies, and conservation.” Cross2, extends this even further by stating: “There is a near-

“Proceedings of the 2005American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright ©2005, American society fro engineering Education”

Adamson, W., & Way, C., & Cowan, D. (2005, June), Abandoning The Lecture:Using Job Meetings To Teach Within An International, Project Based Learning Environment Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/15323

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2005 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015