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Abstraction In Computer Network Education: A Model Based Approach

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Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Issues in Computer Education

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

9.134.1 - 9.134.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14022

Download Count

94

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Paper Authors

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G Murphy

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G Kohli

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S P Maj

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D Veal

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3420

Abstraction in Computer Network Education: A model based approach

G. Kohli, S. P. Maj, G. Murphy & D. Veal Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia

Abstract

Rapid developments in network technology have resulted in the inclusion of ACM/IEEE recommendations for Net-Centric computing as a part of the Computer Science Undergraduate Body of Knowledge. Accordingly ACM/IEEE networking curriculum now represents an increasingly significant component of Computer Science curriculum. Furthermore, relatively inexpensive equipment, such as switches and routers, and associated on-line vendor based curricula, such as CCNA, CCNP, are now readily available. This approach to network technology education requires an understanding of switch and router operation. However, an extensive analysis of educational materials in this area has indicated that these devices are typically treated as 'black boxes'. Such an approach may not be best suited to the promotion of learning as students are required to construct their own mental model of the internal operation of such devices and which may, or may not, be correct. To address this problem a state model has been designed for both switches and routers which allows complexity to be controlled and hence can be used as a basis for teaching both introductory and advanced courses. These models have been used as the pedagogical foundation for both undergraduate and postgraduate curricula in network technology and the results evaluated. Work to date suggests that these models strongly support student learning at all levels. A wide range of students were analysed and significantly students who had studied a number of networking units but had not been taught via these models scored lower than novice students taught using such models.

1. Introduction

Rapid developments in network technology have resulted in the inclusion of ACM/IEEE recommendations for Net-Centric computing within the Computer Science Undergraduate Body of Knowledge. Accordingly ACM/IEEE networking curriculum now represents an increasingly significant component of Computer Science curriculum. A central issue within computer network education is the hands-on laboratory-based approach versus the traditional in-call lecture-based approach. Traditionally, computer networks courses have not provided students with hands-on access to networking equipment and software. However, due to increasing popularity of vendor-based courses as components of undergraduate curricula, students now have the opportunity to study a more practical approach and hence program networking devices (switches, routers). Furthermore, many students are studying networking and internetworking

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Murphy, G., & Kohli, G., & Maj, S. P., & Veal, D. (2004, June), Abstraction In Computer Network Education: A Model Based Approach Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/14022

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