Asee peer logo

Academic Achievement And Retention In A Minority Engineering Program

Download Paper |

Collection

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Recruitment and Retention

Tagged Division

Minorities in Engineering

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

13.136.1 - 13.136.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4387

Download Count

22

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Mary Anderson-Rowland Arizona State University

biography

Callie Ruben Arizona State University

visit author page

Callie Rubin is a Senior in Aerospace Engineering at Arizona State University. She is an active member of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers and the Society of Women Engineers. Callie was the Assistant Program Coordinator for Engineering Diversity Programs and the Summer Minority Engineering Program during 2007.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Academic Achievement and Retention in a Minority Engineering Program

Abstract

The Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU) was awarded funding in 2003 as a part of 13 five-year block grants given to colleges and universities that year. The funding was given by the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) for a program to increase the number of underrepresented minority students (African American, Hispanic, and Native American) enrolled in engineering and to increase their retention and graduation rates to that comparable for non-minority students.

This successful NACME program at ASU has now completed four years of programming and has now had 73 students who have held NACME Scholarships. This paper looks at the NACME program lessons learned, the retention of the NACME cohorts relative to non-minority students and to minority students who did not attend the NACME program, the academic achievement of the students, and areas of the program which could improve. The paper includes the summary of the semester evaluations submitted by the students.

I. Introduction and Background

In 2003, the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) gave 13 five-year block grants to colleges and universities. Arizona State University (ASU) was one of those 13 schools. The purpose of the funding was to increase the number of underrepresented minority students (African American, Hispanic, and Native American) enrolled in engineering and to increase their retention and graduation rates to that comparable for non-minority students. An additional goal of the ASU Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering NACME Program is to have the NACME students go on to graduate school.

There have been many targeted efforts to increase the recruitment and retention of underrepresented minority engineering students.1 Effective retention models for minority freshmen include: summer bridge programs,2 year-long bridge programs,3 minority engineering programs,4,5 and academic scholarship programs6. The NACME program at ASU builds on a summer bridge program and incorporates the other three types of programs just mentioned.7

Each summer the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering runs a two-week residential Minority Engineering (MEP) Bridge Program to interest, encourage, and support minority students just graduated from high school who are thinking about engineering. Nearly 100% of the students who attend the summer bridge program attend ASU in the fall as engineering or computer science students. The School of Engineering includes both Computer Science Engineering and Computer Science in the same department. Henceforth in this paper when engineering is mentioned, it includes engineering and computer science students. Students from this MEP program, as well as all entering minority engineering students, are sent emails to urge them to apply for the NACME scholarship if they qualify. With admission data in hand, emails are just sent to students with at least a 3.0 GPA in high school.

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015