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Academic Industrial Partnerships To Advance Pollution Prevention

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ChE: Innovation to Improve Student Learning

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

11.150.1 - 11.150.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/157

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

biography

C. Stewart Slater Rowan University

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C. Stewart Slater is a Professor and Founding Chair of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his Ph.D., M.S. and B.S. from Rutgers University. His research and teaching interests are in the area of membrane technology where he has applied this to fields such as specialty chemical manufacture, green engineering, bio/pharmaceutical manufacture and food processing. He is the recipient of the 1999 Chester Carlson Award, 1999 and 1998 Joseph J. Martin Award, 1996 George Westinghouse Award, and the 1989 Dow Outstanding New Faculty Award.

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biography

Mariano Savelski Rowan University

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Mariano J. Savelski is Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma and B.S. from the University of Buenos Aires. His research is in the area of process design and optimization with over seven years of industrial experience. He has applied his expertise in water and energy integration in green engineering design to industrial projects from food processing to petroleum refining. He is also involved in research in sustainable fuels, examining ethanol production from biomass. He is the recipient of the 2000 Lindback Foundation Faculty Award.

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Robert Hesketh Rowan University

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Robert P. Hesketh is a Professor and Chair of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his B.S. from the University of Illinois and Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. His research and teaching interests are in the area of reaction engineering, combustion kinetics and process engineering. He is the recipient of the 1999 Ray W. Fahien award, 2001 and 1998 Joseph J. Martin Award, 2002 Robert G. Quinn award, and the 1998 Dow Outstanding New Faculty Award.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Academic - Industrial Partnerships to Advance Pollution Prevention

Abstract

Student projects have examined how to apply pollution prevention strategies to both R&D and manufacturing in several chemical industries. This has been accomplished through industry-university partnerships with pharmaceutical and petrochemical companies. Several grants from the US Environmental Protection Agency have supported initiatives in green chemistry, engineering and design. These projects have the broader goal of supporting sustainability in the chemical industry.

Introduction

Too often the teaching of a technical subject like green engineering is limited to an individual class experience or one dimensional laboratory or design experience. The teaching of pollution prevention in the curriculum is greatly enhanced by active participation of students throughout the curriculum and in real-world projects. Green engineering is a multidisciplinary topic that if practiced to the fullest would greatly improve how industry operates and provide a sustainable future. Rowan University is incorporating green engineering into its curricula in various course and our latest efforts (as described in this paper) are to actively involve industry in green engineering projects through our engineering clinic program. In this paper we refer to the terms pollution prevention and green engineering interchangeably. Green chemistry and engineering methods are forms of pollution prevention. EPA defines pollution prevention/source reduction as any practice which does one or more of the following:

• Reduces the amount of any hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant entering any waste stream or otherwise released into the environment (including fugitive emissions) prior to recycling, treatment or disposal. • Reduces the hazards to public health and the environment associated with the release of such substances, pollutants, or contaminants. • Reduces or eliminates the creation of pollutants through - increased efficiency in the use of raw materials, energy, water, or other resources; or - protection of natural resources by conservation.

Specifically this paper addresses pollution prevention through green chemistry, green engineering and design for the environment strategies.

The EPA originally defined green engineering as the design, commercialization and use of processes and products that are feasible and economical while minimizing the generation of pollution at the source and also minimizing risk to human health and the environment [1]. The

Slater, C. S., & Savelski, M., & Hesketh, R. (2006, June), Academic Industrial Partnerships To Advance Pollution Prevention Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/157

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015