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Adapting the S.I.M. (System, Interactions, and Model) physics problem solving strategy to Engineering Statics and an application to frictional forces on screws

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Conference

2017 FYEE Conference

Location

Daytona Beach, Florida

Publication Date

August 6, 2017

Start Date

August 6, 2017

End Date

August 8, 2017

Conference Session

WIP: Enrollment, Instruction and Pedagogy - Focus on Classroom Practices

Tagged Topic

FYEE Conference - Works in Progress Submission

Page Count

3

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29398

Download Count

14

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Paper Authors

biography

Lu Li Sacramento City College

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Currently Engineering Department Chair at SCC (Sacramento City College)

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Abstract

Prof. Lu Li Sacramento City College

Abstract: Engineering Statics is a core lower-division Engineering class that many students struggle with. Current education research suggests using overarching themes to tie concepts together and to generate deeper understanding. Recent physics education research has found success using the S.I.M. (System, Interactions, and Model) problem solving strategy. Since first-semester physics (classical mechanics) is a prerequisite for Engineering Statics, adapting the S.I.M. strategy to Engineering Statics will leverage prior knowledge and improve student learning. This article suggests an adaptation, referred to as the problem-solving flowchart, which can be used to analyze almost all core Engineering Statics topics, such as equilibrium of a particle, equilibrium of a rigid body, structural analysis, internal forces and friction.

One challenging topic in Engineering Statics is analyzing the impending motion of a square-threaded screw with friction between the thread and the mating groove. The broadly accepted analysis runs contrary to the spirit of the S.I.M. strategy. It also uses a free body diagram (FBD) that is counter-intuitive to students. This article applies the suggested problem-solving flowchart, and provides a variation on a published FBD. The result is a more intuitive analysis, which will improve student learning.

Li, L. (2017, August), Adapting the S.I.M. (System, Interactions, and Model) physics problem solving strategy to Engineering Statics and an application to frictional forces on screws Paper presented at 2017 FYEE Conference, Daytona Beach, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/29398

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