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Adoption of an Online Queue App for Higher Education: A Case Study

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NEE 1 - Innovative Teaching & Learning Strategies

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32042

Download Count

7

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Paper Authors

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Karin Jensen University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Karin Jensen is a Teaching Assistant Professor in bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Before joining UIUC she completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Sanofi Oncology in Cambridge, MA. She earned a bachelor's degree in biological engineering from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Virginia.

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Jennifer R. Amos University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Dr Amos joined the Bioengineering Department at the University of Illinois in 2009 and is currently a Teaching Associate Professor in Bioengineering and an Adjunct Associate Professor in Educational Psychology. She received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Texas Tech and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from University of South Carolina. She completed a Fulbright Program at Ecole Centrale de Lille in France to benchmark and help create a new hybrid masters program combining medicine and engineering and also has led multiple curricular initiative in Bioengineering and the College of Engineering on several NSF funded projects.

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Lawrence Angrave University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign

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Lawrence Angrave is an award winning Teaching Professor at the department of computer science at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). His interests include (but are not limited to) joyful teaching, empirically-sound educational research, campus and online courses, computer science, engaging underrepresented students, improving accessibility and creating novel methods to create, adapt and enhance learning opportunities and learning communities.

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Karle Flanagan

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David Mussulman University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Dave is an Instructional Technology Facilitator with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Engineering IT Shared Services. He helps instructors select and adapt the courses to technologies to enhance student learning and course administration.

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Christopher D. Schmitz University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-9673-9832

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Dr. Christopher Schmitz was born in Pana, Illinois in 1969. He received his B.S. with university honors and M.S. (fault-tolerant adaptive systems) in ECE from the University of Illinois. From 1995-1997, he joined TRW Space and Electronics Group in the areas of satellite communication and antenna systems before returning to the University of Illinois. He completed his Ph.D. in the area of multiuser communication in 2002. Since that time, he has served the College of Engineering and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering as academic professional, visiting lecturer, lecturer, and, currently, senior lecturer and chief undergraduate advisor. His research interests are in adaptive digital signal processing, digital communications, and education pedagogy.

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Wade Fagen-Ulmschneider University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Wade Fagen-Ulmschneider is a Teaching Assistant Professor of Computer Science at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). With a passion for data, he serves as the lead instructor of CS 225 (Data Structures) and works with students on numerous data visualizations that have accumulated over 10,000,000 interactions. In 2016, he was selected as one of the National Academy of Engineering's Frontiers of Engineering Education scholars; in 2017, he was awarded the Collins Award for Innovative Teaching; and he has been consistently ranked as an excellent instructor by his students for the past ten years.

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Abstract

A major concern with increasing student numbers is maintaining the quality of the student experience. Faculty employ both pedagogical approaches and educational technologies to reach ever-increasing numbers of students. While numerous approaches have been successfully deployed in the classrooms of large enrollment courses (for example, iClickers), office hours are often administered in the traditional method which does not account for, nor take advantage of, large student enrollments. As our large courses continue to grow larger, office and lab hours become crowded. Traditionally, students raise their hand or add their name to a whiteboard list to get assistance from course staff. In these settings, course staff may find themselves repeatedly answering the same or similar questions. Students may wait for long periods before getting help from an instructor. Shy students may be hesitant to ask for help or be overpowered by more aggressive personalities. While some office hours are crowded, others have very few students coming in, and rarely do we capture any analytics on utilization or usefulness of these one-to-one interactions with students.

To facilitate office hours in large courses, we have previously described the development of an online queuing software for educational use. While the tool was initially developed for office hours in large enrollment courses, the Queue has been adopted in several additional use cases including advising, peer learning, and active learning. In these early adoption cases, we have identified benefits of implementing the Queue in educational settings, including saving time for students and instructors and expanding learning environments beyond classrooms and faculty offices. Further, the Queue can collect rich data that can help instructors identify common questions or “muddiest points”. Instructors can use this data to assess course delivery, content, and performance of course staff. Overall, these benefits and features of the Queue provide educators with an easy-to-use tool for working with large student numbers. Here we present our findings from combining user surveys and interviews to present the use of the Queue in diverse educational settings.

Jensen, K., & Amos, J. R., & Angrave, L., & Flanagan, K., & Mussulman, D., & Schmitz, C. D., & Fagen-Ulmschneider, W. (2019, June), Adoption of an Online Queue App for Higher Education: A Case Study Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32042

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