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Advanced Internet Technology In Laboratory Modules For Distance Learning

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

6.139.1 - 6.139.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8889

Download Count

49

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Paper Authors

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Tor Fjeldly

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Raymond Berntzen

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Michael Shur

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Kjetil Smith

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Jan Strandman

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Hong Shen

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3532

Advanced Internet Technology in Laboratory Modules for Distance Learning

Kjetil Smith, Jan O. Strandman, Raymond Berntzen, Tor A. Fjeldly, Michael S. Shur, Hong Shen

Physics Department, Oslo University, Norway/ UniK-Center for Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway/ ECSE Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590

Abstract

We describe user-friendly and efficient technologies for interactive, on-line operation of laboratory experiments over the Internet. The objectives are to utilize the most recent advances in Internet and World Wide Web, to allow communication with minimum overhead, to provide a functional client interface, to establish a variety of experiments, and to allow flexibility in configuring experiments. Our remote lab is based on a client/server architecture where students can communicate with the lab server using regular Web browsers. To fully utilize the functionalities of modern browsers and servers, the server may respond in formats such as JavaScript, HTML or XML. This is achieved by creating Web-solutions based on Internet Server Application Programming Interface (ISAPI) extensions, whereby important issues related to queuing and security are addressed. We also discuss an alternative solution based on LabVIEW 6i where the client uses LabVIEW Player. Presently, our remote lab is dedicated to semiconductor device characterization. It has been tested in distance-education courses on device technology with good results.

1. Introduction

The use of Internet and studio classrooms is an emerging trend for promoting “individual discovery” as a strategy for enhancing engineering education. Here we describe how these techniques can be combined with traditional laboratory exercises to create a suitable environment for interactive, on-line operation of lab experiments over the Internet, to be used either in the classroom, in a studio setting, or from a remote location as part of a distance learning strategy.1

Central issues in creating a user-friendly and efficient technology for interactive, on-line operation of laboratory experiments over the Internet are to utilize recent advances in Internet and World Wide Web, to allow communication with minimum overhead, to provide a functional client interface, to establish a variety of experiments, and to allow flexibility in configuring experiments. Our remote lab is based on a client/server architecture where students communicate with the lab server using regular Web browsers. Previous versions of the lab were based on a TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) solution, which used a Java Applet on the client (i.e., student) side.1,2 This was achieved by means of a JVM (Java Virtual Machine) in the Web browser that can download and execute Java code. The client sees a pop-up window that provides interaction and communication directly with the server. Java Applets provide good control. However, unsigned Applets make it awkward for the client to store and present the

”Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright Ó 2001, American Society for Engineering Education”

Fjeldly, T., & Berntzen, R., & Shur, M., & Smith, K., & Strandman, J., & Shen, H. (2001, June), Advanced Internet Technology In Laboratory Modules For Distance Learning Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/8889

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