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An Additive Innovation-Based Faculty Development Program: Methods for Case Study Research

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

NSF Grantees: Faculty Development 1

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

16

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34102

Permanent URL

https://jee.org/34102

Download Count

33

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Paper Authors

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Hadi Ali Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

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Hadi Ali is a doctoral student in Engineering Education Systems and Design at Arizona State University.

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Rohini Abhyankar Arizona State University

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Rohini Abhyankar is a fourth year graduate student at Arizona State University’s Engineering Education Systems and Design doctoral program. Rohini has a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Syracuse University and Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees in Physics from University of Delhi, India. Rohini has over ten years each of industry and teaching experience. Her dissertation focus is on understanding the dynamic workplace interactions including values and behaviors of engineers and the influence on job satisfaction and persistence.

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Samantha Ruth Brunhaver Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

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Samantha Brunhaver is an Assistant Professor of Engineering in the Fulton Schools of Engineering Polytechnic School. Dr. Brunhaver recently joined Arizona State after completing her M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. She also has a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University. Dr. Brunhaver's research examines the career decision-making and professional identity formation of engineering students, alumni, and practicing engineers. She also conducts studies of new engineering pedagogy that help to improve student engagement and understanding.

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Jennifer M. Bekki Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

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She teaches courses in the engineering and manufacturing engineering programs as well as programs in the Engineering Education Systems and Design PhD program. Her research interests include topics related to student persistence, STEM doctoral student experiences, faculty mentorship and development, modeling and analysis of complex manufacturing systems, and the development of new discrete event simulation methodologies. Bekki is the co-director of the interdisciplinary, National Science Foundation supported CareerWISE research program, which strives to: 1) understand the experiences of diverse women who are pursuing and leaving doctoral programs in science and engineering and 2) increase women’s persistence in science and engineering doctoral programs through the development and dissemination of an online resilience and interpersonal communication training program.

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Shawn S. Jordan Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1639-779X

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SHAWN JORDAN, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of engineering in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches context-centered electrical engineering and embedded systems design courses, and studies the use of context and storytelling in both K-12 and undergraduate engineering design education. He received his Ph.D. in Engineering Education (2010) and M.S./B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Purdue University. Dr. Jordan is PI on several NSF-funded projects related to design, including an NSF Early CAREER Award entitled “CAREER: Engineering Design Across Navajo Culture, Community, and Society” and “Might Young Makers be the Engineers of the Future?,” and is a Co-PI on the NSF Revolutionizing Engineering Departments grant “Additive Innovation: An Educational Ecosystem of Making and Risk Taking.” He was named one of ASEE PRISM’s “20 Faculty Under 40” in 2014, and received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President Obama in 2017.

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Micah Lande South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

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Micah Lande, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor and E.R. Stensaas Chair for Engineering Education in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology. He teaches human-centered engineering design, design thinking, and design innovation courses. Dr. Lande researches how technical and non-technical people learn and apply design thinking and making processes to their work. He is interested in the intersection of designerly epistemic identities and vocational pathways. Dr. Lande received his B.S. in Engineering (Product Design), M.A. in Education (Learning, Design and Technology) and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering (Design Education) from Stanford University. He was previously an Assistant Professor in the Engineering and Manufacturing Engineering programs and Tooker Professor for Effective STEM Education at the Polytechnic School in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University.

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Abstract

This paper describes a methodological approach for designing and preparing case study research on a faculty development program based on the additive innovation cycle. The program was implemented as part of a National Science Foundation-funded “Revolutionizing Engineering and Computer Science Departments” research project. The enacted intervention focused on promoting the sharing, scaling, and sustainability of pedagogical risk-taking within an engineering curriculum for 15 faculty participants with teaching-focused appointments (i.e., not tenured or tenure-track faculty), and between 0-13 years of teaching experience. Faculty professional development activities were organized around the four stages of the additive innovation cycle: (1) becoming inspired by the local community and instructor peers, (2) sharing and learning about pedagogical ideas and artifacts, (3) iterating on one’s own pedagogical ideas and artifacts, and (4) sharing their pedagogical innovations back to the community. Each faculty member was interviewed three times throughout the program, and each interview lasted approximately one hour. Interviews were reflective in nature, inquiring about participants’ mindsets and interests in pedagogical risk-taking across the professional development activities. Interviews were supplemented by longitudinal surveys to assess changes in pedagogical risk-taking preferences and behaviors and video recordings in which participants described the innovation that they developed and implemented over the course of their participation in the program. The overarching research question for this study was: How are instructors in an undergraduate engineering program impacted (positively and negatively) by participation in an additive innovation cycle focused on pedagogy?

In this paper, we discuss methods and progress towards formally defining case studies and iteratively building a logic model to capture the outcomes of faculty participation in the additive innovation cycle. We describe the set of decisions made throughout the analysis planning stage to identify patterns of behavior among cases: why decisions were made, how they were implemented, and to what ends. For example, a decision was made to create a “profile” for each participant based on their interview, survey and video reflection data that summarized how they changed as a result of participation in the program. Particular attention was paid to changes in their self-described pedagogical risk-taking behaviors and teaching philosophy. The work to build cases will be described, and additional examples will be shared.

This work is intended to serve as an example for engineering education researchers of how a case study method approach can be used to study complex phenomena with multiple variables of interest (in this case, the process of using professional development to initiate a faculty change initiative). The paper will also share how a case study research design can benefit from application of a theoretical framework (e.g., the additive innovation cycle) and from the collection of multiple sources of qualitative and quantitative evidence (i.e., interviews, survey and artifacts) to help triangulate findings.

Ali, H., & Abhyankar, R., & Brunhaver, S. R., & Bekki, J. M., & Jordan, S. S., & Lande, M. (2020, June), An Additive Innovation-Based Faculty Development Program: Methods for Case Study Research Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34102

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