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An Application Oriented Course Sequence In Electronics In Ecet

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Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Curriculum Development in Electrical ET

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

9.162.1 - 9.162.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12735

Download Count

59

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Paper Authors

author page

Chandra Sekhar

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Jai Agrawal

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Omer Farook

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session: 2648

An Application Oriented Course Sequence in Electronics in ECET Jai P. Agrawal, Omer Farook and Chandra Sekhar Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology Purdue University Calumet

ABSTRACT

As the data rates in computers and communication systems zoom into the gigabit range, the analog signal techniques have assumed great importance. New analog design techniques and circuit layout techniques are being used in modern industry. There is an urgent need for bringing these advancements into the classroom. Furthermore, with availability of so many integrated circuits and systems-on-chip, the electronic design in industry has become more system oriented than before. This paper presents a sequence of two courses to meet the above needs in the undergraduate electronics courses: Analog Electronics and Digital Electronics. The courses use top-down instruction starting from the system level followed by component level understanding. The first course is oriented to teach the system level input-output characteristics of analog electronic components and subsystems. The second course focuses on teaching the modern digital ICs and their applications, the design of high speed switching circuits using the modern electronic design automation (EDA) tools. The topics in the second course include the power up/down sequencing, hot-swap circuits, clock generator and recovery circuits, heat management considerations, various signaling standards and an introduction to signal integrity, EMI, shielding, grounding and layout issues in printed circuit boards, integrated circuits and packages. Students use the simulation tools which are currently being used in industry thus reducing the gap between industry and education. The hardware experiments help in developing troubleshooting skills and learning about components.

I. Introduction

There is renewed activity in the field of analog electronics in the modern communication and networking industry. As the data rates in computers and communication systems increase into the gigabit range, the analog signal techniques have greater importance. New analog design techniques and circuit layout techniques are being used in modern industry. Many of the current analog course sequences consist of courses to teach physics of electronic components such as diodes and transistors and a substantial part of the course is devoted to learning discrete design techniques. However, most technology graduates work on systems that use integrated circuits and electronic subsystems. Very rarely, they are asked to design with discrete components. The design using discrete components is required in semiconductor industry, but they require more depth in the subject than what can be learned at the undergraduate level. Therefore, there is an urgent need for shifting the focus from microelectronics and discrete design to designing with integrated circuits and design issues at system-level. Furthermore, new developments and design techniques in electronics must be incorporated in the undergraduate electronics courses.

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Sekhar, C., & Agrawal, J., & Farook, O. (2004, June), An Application Oriented Course Sequence In Electronics In Ecet Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/12735

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